“I was floored by what we discovered,” declared Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-Ala.). Sessions, Ranking Member of the Senate Budget Committee, had asked his staff to compute the long-term costs of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ObamaCare). After three months of combing through the hundreds of pages of the law and comparing their expected costs to the United States’ fiscal outlook for the next 75 years — just as the government currently does for other programs such as Social Security and Medicare — Sessions’ staff estimated that ObamaCare has created a $17 trillion unfunded liability for the U.S. government.

 

There may very well be a train wreck coming if and when the Supreme Court declares the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act ("ObamaCare") unconstitutional just before the justices hightail it out of town for their summer vacation. But it may not be the train wreck that some are eagerly predicting for the Obama administration.

 

As the nation faces a crucial election in a little over six months, the Republican Party appears to be caving in on a social issue that many conservatives consider of major import: same-sex marriage. What the GOP felt strongly enough about some 16 years ago to lead the fight for passage of the federal Defense of Marriage

Allegations of fraud surrounding an Obama campaign donor have ignited further controversy for the President’s reelection effort, as another prominent supporter has purportedly engaged in illegal activity. Abake Assongba and her husband, Anthony J.W. DeRosa, doled out more than $50,000 to Obama’s reelection campaign this year, government records show. Assongba is also facing a lawsuit in Florida, where she allegedly stole $657,000 to help finance a multimillion-dollar home in the state.

A T-shirt company in Lexington, Kentucky, is facing the wrath of a local homosexual activist contingent after the business politely passed on producing T-shirts for the city’s “gay pride” festival. On March 26, Lexington’s Gay and Lesbian Services Organization (GLSO) filed a discrimination complaint against the family-owned company, Hands On Originals, alleging that the firm had bid on producing the shirts, but when it was selected its owners changed their minds, explaining that their Christian values made them unable to fill the order for the “gay”-themed apparel.

 

The journalists and activists challenging the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) in federal court may have moved the case against the due-process-denying law a little closer toward a final hearing on the merits of their complaint.

The battle is heating up in Anchorage, Alaska, over a voter initiative that would add “sexual orientation” and “transgender identity” to anti-discrimination language in the city’s municipal code. Homosexual activists insist that Prop 5, which the city’s nearly 300,000 residents will vote on April 3, is a common sense measure that “simply provides to gay and transgender Alaskans the same legal protections that we already provide to other persons in Anchorage in employment, financial practices, housing, and restaurants, department stores, and other businesses,” according to OneAnchorage.com, a website promoting passage of the measure.

 

The most important rule in constitutional law, the late Justice William Brennan liked to tell his law clerks, is "the rule of five." Five votes out of nine on the high court are all it takes to make constitutional law and change the course of history.

 

On Wednesday, Republican presidential contender Dr. Ron Paul delivered a rousing speech in defense of liberty to a standing-room-only crowd at the University of Maryland-College Park Campus.
 
 

The Freedom From Religion Foundation (FFRF) has found its latest target. The national atheist club has filed a federal lawsuit against a Pennsylvania legislator for a resolution, passed earlier this year in the state House of Representatives, that declares 2012 as the “Year of the Bible” in the state. The suit, which argues that the proclamation violates the First Amendment’s Establishment Clause, names the author of the resolution, State Representative Rick Saccone, as a defendant, along with the state House’s Parliamentarian, Clancy Myer, and the Chief Clerk of the House, Anthony Frank Barbush.
 

 

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