Barrack Obama made it official May 9, becoming the first sitting U.S. President to endorse homosexual marriage.

The demand that Congress give more power to the Justice Department to track citizens through their cellphones is meeting resistance.

 

 No one ever accused Jeremy Bentham of thinking small. The early 18th-century British philosopher, social reformer, and co-founder of the celebrated philosophical school of Utilitarianism, Bentham was known for his unconventional ideas. Like many self-styled progressive thinkers of his age, Bentham expended a considerable amount of energy dreaming up new ways to use the power of the state to protect private citizens from their own alleged follies.

As a candidate, Barack Obama promised to protect government whistleblowers from prosecution, but as President his administration has zealously pursued legal prosecution of these brave men and women.

 

 

 

Texas inmate Keith Judd took 40 percent of the vote — to President Obama's 60 percent — in West Virginia's Democratic primary, as Democrats in that state use the primary to issue a protest against the Obama administration's anti-coal policies.

The trial of the five men accused of participating in the planning of the attacks of September 11, 2001 began before a military tribunal at Guantanamo Bay on May 5.

Federal legislation sponsored by “progressive” Democrat lawmakers, dubbed the “Trayvon Amendment” to play on people’s emotions in the wake of the now-infamous Florida shooting, would aim to bully state governments into restricting self-defense rights by withholding federal taxpayer funds. The controversial attack on individual and state rights was withdrawn from the House floor this week for being “out of order.” But it is not dead yet.

Romney's expanded campaign staff confirms that if he’s elected nothing will change from Obama; the staff is full of elite globalists, many from the Council on Foreign Relations.

Withstanding intense pressure from homosexual activist groups, voters in North Carolina overwhelmingly approved a constitutional amendment defining marriage as only between a man and a woman — effectively prohibiting homosexual “marriage” in the state.

Richard Mourdock, a Tea Party favorite, captured more than 60 percent of the vote in the Indiana Republican primary to oust longtime U.S. Senator Richard Lugar — demonstrating the clout of the Tea Party and sending a strong message to the establishment wing of the Republican Party.

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