Marvin “Chick” Heileson is making his second attempt in 2012 to unseat seven-term incumbent Republican Rep. Mike Simpson in Idaho's second congressional district GOP primary.

 

An Internet censorship and privacy-destroying bill will be taken up by the House this week.

President Barack Obama, a Democrat, wants Congress to extend a student loan interest rate cut set to expire in July; Mitt Romney, the odds-on favorite to head the Republican ticket opposing Obama in November, agrees. Florida Sen. Marco Rubio, a Republican considered a likely running mate for Romney, is pushing a bill that would allow young illegal immigrants to remain in the United States legally under certain conditions; Romney refuses to say whether he supports it despite having privately endorsed it. What gives?

This is “cybersecurity week,” according to Brock Meeks at Wired.com when CISPA (the Orwellian-named Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act) is scheduled to move to the House floor for a vote. Offered originally before SOPA (the Stop Online Piracy Act) and its sister PIPA (Preventing Real Online Threats to Economic Creativity and Theft of Intellectual Property Act) were blown up in January, Reps. Mike Rogers (R-Mich.) and Dutch Ruppersberger (D-Md.) have offered some amendments to the bill (H.R. 3523) to soften some of its critics and to avoid the same result.

In a well-researched article published online last month by The New American, Brian Koenig succinctly described capital cronyism. Koenig writes:  

Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels, the purported founders of communism, established in the 19th century a government paradigm that transformed Europe and other regions in the eastern hemisphere, adding to an already expansive repertoire of political ideologies. And the seemingly farfetched assertion that communism could someday take control of America seems, quite simply, unfathomable. But is it really that improbable, or furthermore, has it already ensnared certain sectors of society?

 

The shadowy but controversial National Security Agency (NSA) — despite U.S. law and constitutional protections — has collected most of the e-mails sent and received by Americans, agency whistleblower William Binney explained during an explosive TV interview. Phone calls and other forms of electronic communications are also routinely targeted.

“Sound and fury signifying nothing.” That is how Shakespeare’s Macbeth described life. That same description could be aptly applied to a bill introduced recently in the House of Representatives that purports to cure the cancerous malady that is the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA).

 Six-term incumbent Utah Senator Orrin Hatch will face a primary opponent for the first time since he was elected to the U.S. Senate in 1976, after the Utah GOP convention narrowly failed Saturday to give him the 60 percent super-majority needed to avoid a primary. The 78-year-old Senator came up just 31 votes short of avoiding a primary, and will face former state Senator Dan Liljenquist in the primary.

The CIA wants permission to deploy drones to seek and destroy suspected terrorists regardless of the potential for collateral damage (read: innocent people who might be in the kill zone).

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