As outrage and concern over the Federal Reserve and its embattled fiat currency continue to grow, lawmakers in Missouri are considering legislation to protect residents by making gold and silver legal tender within the state. If passed, Missouri would join the state of Utah — which adopted a similar sound-money law last year — in its efforts to expand the monetary choices available to citizens.

The Air Force has caved in to an atheist group by dropping a policy that ensures there are Bibles in lodgings on Air Force bases.

 

President Obama last week gave an interview in the Situation Room at the White House to discuss the decision he made one year ago to send Navy SEALs on the mission that resulted in killing of al Qaeda leader Osama Bin Laden. And less that three years after Obama was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, he is winning praise as the "Warrior in Chief" carrying on a "militarily aggressive" foreign policy.

When the General Services Administration's Las Vegas party that cost taxpayers more than $800,000 made national news, even congressional Democrats got outraged, though they missed the point about the general inefficiency of government.

After being denied access to delegates, supporters in the Ron Paul campaign have gained control of the Alaska State Republican Party.

Ron Paul dominated the Louisiana presidential caucuses April 28. The same day, his supporters also out-organized the presumed GOP presidential nominee in Mitt Romney's home state of Massachusetts and took over the Alaska Republican Party.

Samantha Power, who has been chosen by President Obama to head the new Atrocities Prevention Board, is a proponent of the Right to Protect doctrine, a key aspect of which promotes the redistribution of sovereignty.

 

 In the circular world of U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio, you have to go further right to get to the left.  "I recently joked that today, in the U.S. Senate, on foreign policy, if you go far enough to the right, you wind up on the left," the Florida Republican said in a widely publicized speech on foreign policy to the Brookings Institution in Washington, D.C. on April 25.

Following 10-plus years of legal conflict thanks to a nuisance lawsuit filed in 2001 by the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), a federal judge has finally ruled that a cross placed in the Mojave Desert in 1934 to honor World War I veterans may remain there permanently.

In the settlement approved April 23, the National Park Service will turn over the hilltop area known as Sunrise Rock, upon which the simple cross sat before being removed by the park service, in return for the private donation of five acres elsewhere in the 1.6 million acre preserve in Southern California. The care of the cross site will fall to a Veterans of Foreign Wars post in Barstow, California, along with the Veterans Home of California-Barstow, reported the Associated Press.

“Once the swap is complete, the park service will fence the site, leaving entrances for visitors, and post signs noting that it is private land,” reported AP. Said Mojave National Preserve spokeswoman Linda Slater of the lengthy legal wrangling: “We want to wrap this, we want to get it done. No cross can go up until the exchange is complete.”

The land is being donated by Henry and Wanda Sandoz, who lived in the area before moving to Yucca Valley. Henry had promised World War I veteran Riley Bembry, who first erected the cross in 1934, that he would continue caring for the site after Bembry died, and Wanda said that over the years her husband cared for or replaced several crosses that had been stolen or defaced. “We love the cross,” she told AP. “It’s in a beautiful spot…. My husband is not a veteran, but he feels like this is something he can do for our country.”

With little more than a month to go until Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker faces his recall vote, unions and their supporters are pulling out all the stops to replace him with one of their own.

Writing for the pro-union newsletter The Progressive, its political editor Ruth Conniff decried every major piece of “Act 10” — the highly contested Budget Repair Bill that Walker finally got passed by the Wisconsin legislature last March — saying that “If you want a preview of the Mitt Romney/Paul Ryan plan for America, take a look at Wisconsin:

         - Huge tax breaks for corporations….

         - Deep cuts to health care, education, unemployment insurance….

         - Rolling back … protections and … regulations….

         - Waging war on labor unions, taking away public employee’s collective bargaining rights….

So where does this blueprint leave us?

Wisconsin is now dead last in the nation, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, for job loss.

Between January 2011 and January 2012, while 44 states and the nation as a whole were adding jobs, Wisconsin was one of only six states to lose jobs — and Wisconsin's job loss was the worst among that handful of losers.

 

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