As the 2012 election nears, the race for the Hispanic vote becomes more and more critical, as President Obama and his presumed Republican rival Mitt Romney scramble to recruit minority supporters. The Obama campaign, for example, launched on Wednesday a series of Spanish-language advertisements in Florida, Nevada, and Colorado that highlight the President’s purported dedication to boosting federal funding for education. 

Last November, President Obama stood before an audience and said government needs to be “responsive to the needs of people, not the needs of special interests.” He added, “That is probably the biggest piece of business that remains unfinished.”

 Across the political spectrum, amid growing violence and destruction, Latin American leaders assembled in Colombia for the "Summit of the Americas" urged President Obama to reconsider the U.S. government’s decades-old “war on drugs.” And domestically, pressure is growing as well.

 The JBS has sent an educational packet to all police chiefs and sheriffs in the U.S.

With Rick Santorum out of the presidential sweepstakes, many evangelicals who tenaciously supported the Catholic candidate seem reluctant to throw their support to Mitt Romney. According to Doug Wead, a senior adviser to Ron Paul’s presidential campaign, many of those former Santorum supporters are now taking a hard look at the conservative Texas Congressman, not necessarily because they think he can win the nomination, but because the “longer that Ron Paul and Newt Gingrich stay in the race, the more likely that Romney will be forced to take an evangelical conservative as his vice presidential nominee,” wrote Wead on NewsMax.com.

Campaigning to make economic “fairness” the central theme of his reelection campaign, President Obama on April 10 pitched his “Buffett Rule” tax hike to a student audience at Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton.

 
 

In an effort to woo Hispanic voters, President Obama made a pledge Saturday to push for immigration reform early in his second term. "This is something I care deeply about, [and] it’s personal to me," Obama told news anchor Enrique Acevedo in a television interview with Univision, a network viewed largely by Hispanics in the United States. Obama’s appearances on Univision have been frequent, as Saturday marked the 15th time he has been interviewed by the network, which purportedly reaches 97 percent of Hispanic households in the United States.

 
 

Controversial legislation making its way through Congress would give the federal government the power to stop Americans who allegedly owe back taxes to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) from leaving the country. But the questionable amendment to revoke, limit, or deny passports buried inside a massive “transportation” bill — quietly added in by Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid — is already under fire from numerous experts who say it violates the U.S. Constitution. 

 
 

Despite the fact that in 2011 President Barack Obama paid a lower tax rate than his secretary — the very circumstance Obama hopes to rectify with the so-called “Buffett Rule” — the President refuses to send one penny more than the law requires to the U.S. Treasury this year, his chief campaign strategist told Fox News Sunday.

 
 

Apparently the soaring national debt and the threat of a nuclear Iran are not enough to occupy the government's time, because the Obama administration is pushing to force Westchester County, N.Y., to create more low-income housing, in order to mix and match classes and races to fit the government's preconceptions.

 
 
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