Students of history may recall the year 49 B.C. Early in that momentous year, a popular soldier-statesman crossed the Rubicon River, thus effectively declaring war on the citizens on the Republic whose acclaim had exalted him to the pinnacle of authority and strength. The details of the story are recounted by the historian Suetonius. Suetonius writes that upon approaching the banks of that historic boundary, Julius Caesar stood before his legion of faithful soldiers and uttered the now-famous phrase: alea iacta est ("the die has been cast"). With those three words, Caesar signaled the end of the Roman Republic. The rule of law soon was supplanted by the rule of one ambitious (audacious?) man.

 

On Thursday the U.S. Senate rejected a measure that would have provided conscience protections for individuals and institutions opposed to President Obama’s mandate requiring employers to provide free access to contraception in their health insurance coverage — including abortion-inducing drugs.
 

A Christian pastor who tried to encourage Muslims to leave Islam will receive $100,000 in damages from Dearborn, Michigan, which tried to stop him from evangelizing at the city’s Arab-American Festival.
 
 

On Wednesday U.S. District Court Judge Richard Leon ruled in favor of five tobacco companies protesting requirements by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to have them put on their cigarette packs graphic images of the consequences of smoking.
 
 

The man named by Reason magazine as the number one contender to assume the mantle of Ron Paul after the good doctor retires from Congress is supposedly in danger of losing his seat in the House of Representatives.
 
 

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is not afraid of congressional oversight into its domestic spying program.  Last week, DHS Chief Privacy Officer Mary Ellen Callahan and Director of Operations Coordination and Planning Richard Chavez testified before the House Subcommittee on Counterintelligence and Intelligence, and their testimony was alarming to those concerned about the near constant assault by the federal government on the Constitution and the Fourth Amendment in particular.
 
 

The “Cold Case Posse” of Maricopa County, Arizona, has concluded it has “probable cause” that the President’s birth certificate released by the White House last April is “a computer-generated” forgery.

 

If you want to witness the eventual direction of “diversity” in America, you may want to take a long look at what is happening in Canada. Under the new Education Act poised for implementation in Alberta, Christian schools and homeschool parents would be prohibited, as part of their academic program, from teaching children that homosexuality is sinful.
 
 

Another state legislator is riding to the defense of the Tenth Amendment and the Constitution.  On February 21, 2012, Utah State Senator Todd Weiler (R-Woods Cross) submitted S.C.R. 11, a resolution calling for the Congress to “repeal or clarify Sections 1021 and 1022 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2012.”

Saying "Mexican" rather than "Hispanic," asserting that the majority of welfare recipients are black, or suggesting that most terrorists are of Muslim descent are remarks often characterized as racist or derogatory. But associating Catholics with pedophiles and referring to communion as a "barbaric ritual" is, apparently, politically correct, at least, according to some standards.
 
 

JBS Facebook JBS Twitter JBS YouTube JBS RSS Feed