Georgia’s Supreme Court has overturned a law banning advertising for assisted suicide, ruling that it unconstitutionally restricts free speech. The legislature had enacted the law in 1994 in an attempt to keep “right to die” proponents such as Dr. Jack Kevorkian from offering their services in the state.

The Intolerable Acts was the name used by American colonists to describe a series of oppressive measures passed by the British Parliament in 1774 relating to the amount of self-government permissible in the American colonies. The acts sparked outrage and firm resistance to the tyrannical regime of King George III throughout the 13 colonies. These arbitrary violations of the rights of the colonists — rights enjoyed by all Englishmen — resulted in the convening of the First Continental Congress in order to organize a formal denouncement of the decrees and to unite the Americans in their resistance to the Crown. Despite various attempts by several delegates to reconcile with Britain, independence was declared within two years and the American War for Independence raged until liberty was achieved in 1783.
 
 
 
 

It is increasingly difficult to distinguish the friends of liberty from the foes. Representative Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) is perceived by Republicans to be a “conservative,” but despite that misleading label, Ryan is determined to hand a crown, jewel by jewel, to the President in the form of line-item veto power.
 
 

“The time for austerity is not today,” White House Chief of Staff Jacob Lew declared on the February 12 Meet the Press, providing an apt motto for President Barack Obama’s latest budget proposal, which foresees trillions of dollars in deficit spending, phony spending cuts, genuine tax hikes, and a refusal to address budget-busting entitlements. In other words, it’s a typical Washington budget proposal.
 

A funny thing happened to Mitt Romney on the way to his coronation as the inevitable Republican candidate for President of the United States. Minnesota, Missouri and Colorado happened. Rick Santorum beat him in all three states on the same day — and beat him by huge margins in two of those states, as well as upsetting him in Colorado, where the Mormon vote was expected to give Romney a victory.

America’s Roman Catholic bishops have joined other Christian and conservative voices in rejecting President Obama’s “compromise” on his earlier announced mandate requiring all employers — including most religious institutions — to include free contraception to women in their health insurance coverage.
 
 

Having spent time at the past two CPAC conventions as an exhibitor with The John Birch Society, and having had the Society officially disinvited to attend in 2012, some thoughts about the latest right-wing beauty contest seem appropriate. But first, some reminiscences about our presence at two previous gatherings are worthy of space.

 

After sailing through the subcommittee in late December, last Thursday by a vote of 11-7 the full Senate Judiciary Committee passed on to the full chamber a bill that would permit televising proceedings of the U.S. Supreme Court.

An attorney for an American accused of conspiring to carry out the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 has filed suit in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia challenging a new rule at the Guantanamo Bay Detention Facility instructing agents of the military and the government to read all correspondence between lawyers and those prisoners suspected of being 9/11 conspirators.

 

The mass media have repeated the official results for the Maine GOP presidential caucuses that former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney narrowly beat Texas Congressman Ron Paul by a 39 percent to 36 percent margin. But the official results are incomplete. And postponement of the results from one of Ron Paul's strongest counties, Washington County, because of a forecasted  snowstorm may alone have tipped the balance in Romney's favor.

 

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