On Friday attorneys for the Obama administration filed a motion with the Supreme Court requesting more time in which to make its oral arguments in defense of ObamaCare.  The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (H.R. 3590) obligates every American to purchase a qualifying health insurance policy by 2014 or be subject to a tax penalty, with failure to pay possibly resulting in imprisonment.
 
 

The Washington Post reports:  "It’s not often that Congress voluntarily surrenders power, and even less common for both parties to agree to do so."
 

Former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney won 50 percent of the vote in the Nevada caucuses February 4. Romney's margin of victory over second-place Newt Gingrich (21 percent) and Ron Paul (19 percent) was directly a result of the 25 percent of caucus-goers who were Mormon; Romney won almost 90 percent of that demographic. (Note: After this article was originally published, the percentages in the previous sentence were updated to reflect the certified results announced Feb. 6.)

 

Sen. Charles Grassley (R-Iowa) issued a five-page letter Wednesday demanding that Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Commissioner Margaret Hamburg disclose who authorized an effort to monitor email correspondence of a group of whistleblower scientists. In the letter, Grassley warned that FDA officials could be usurping their authority by retaliating against whistleblowers who have expressed concern with the agency’s procedures.
 
 

In Federalist No. 46, James Madison predicted:  But ambitious encroachments of the federal government, on the authority of the State governments, would not excite the opposition of a single State, or of a few States only. They would be signals of general alarm. Every government would espouse the common cause. A correspondence would be opened. Plans of resistance would be concerted. One spirit would animate and conduct the whole. The same combinations, in short, would result from an apprehension of the federal, as was produced by the dread of a foreign, yoke; and unless the projected innovations should be voluntarily renounced, the same appeal to a trial of force would be made in the one case as was made in the other.
 
 

Congress has the constitutional authority to approve the Keystone XL pipeline project.

Lawmakers in Washington State joined a growing nationwide rebellion this week against the federal government’s purported new power to indefinitely detain Americans suspected of certain crimes under the 2012 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA). Legislators in Virginia, Rhode Island, Tennessee, and other states — as well as a broad coalition of activists spanning the entire political spectrum — are also working to kill what critics call the “treasonous” usurpation.

 

Alexander Hamilton wrote in The Federalist Papers that: “[T]he practice of arbitrary imprisonments [has] been, in all ages, the favorite and most formidable instrument of tyranny.”

This principle of constitutional liberty, when applied to the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA), reveals a frightening truth about the powers illegally granted the President in that legislation.

As has been recounted many times (never enough, however, given the urgency of the situation in which our Republic is now found) in this magazine and elsewhere, in various provisions of the NDAA, the Congress granted to the President the power to deploy the military of the United States to arrest and indefinitely detain American citizens inside or outside of the United States suspected by him (the President) of posing a military threat to national security.

Once the suspect is imprisoned, the NDAA authorizes the President to deny that person access to legal counsel (in defiance of the Sixth Amendment) and to refuse habeas corpus petitions requiring the government to inform the accused of the crimes with which he or she is being charged (in defiance of Article I, Section 8 of the Constitution). This latter deprivation of civil liberties, the one Hamilton described as tyrannical, is being challenged again by a man being held at the Guantanamo Bay Detention Facility.

As the 2012 election surges forward, the Obama campaign has released a lengthy report detailing 445 of the President’s top "bundlers" — networks of fundraisers who collect large bundles of checks — including wealthy investors, Hollywood moguls, and big-name real estate tycoons. In total, the 445 bundlers doled out $74-100 million to the Obama campaign, according to figures estimated by NBC News.

 

From 1993 until midway through 2011, Newt Gingrich repeatedly and quite forcefully argued that the federal government ought to impose an ObamaCare-like individual mandate on Americans, requiring them to have health insurance or otherwise to demonstrate that they can pay their future healthcare bills. (Regular readers of The New American are well aware of this because this publication has covered the story extensively.) However, a recently unearthed recording of a 2009 conference call featuring the former Speaker of the House is getting quite a bit of attention in the blogosphere because it suggests to some that Gingrich explicitly endorsed the healthcare legislation then beginning its trek through the legislative process.
 
 

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