After an early meteoric surge in the polls, followed by steadily declining popularity among voters, Texas Governor Rick Perry, as expected, dropped out of the GOP presidential race on January 19.

“I know when it is time to make a strategic retreat,” said Perry at a late morning press conference in South Carolina, where other Republican primary candidates were aggressively campaigning ahead of the state’s January 21 primary. “I will leave the trail, return to Texas, and lay down my 2012 campaign.”

 

How high can America’s astronomical debt reach? The level is set to increase once more in late January as Congress, in effect, rubber stamps President Obama’s request to raise the limit on the nation’s debt beyond its current $15 trillion.

 

Yesterday Ron Paul introduced a bill to repeal the Indefinite Detention Section of the NDAA law.

The U.S. Supreme Court has refused to hear a pair of cases involving the offering of prayers at county and school board meetings, continuing its decades-long tradition of steering clear of ruling on the supposed constitutionality of public prayers. According to BloombergNews.com, the High Court “hasn’t ruled on the constitutionality of prayer at government meetings since 1983, when the justices said lawmakers could begin sessions with nonsectarian prayers offered by a state-employed chaplain.”


 

Despite the rhetoric of most GOP presidential hopefuls, almost half of all Republican primary voters believe the U.S. government must stop spending so much money meddling in world affairs and should focus primarily on domestic priorities instead, according to a new poll released Tuesday by the Washington Times.

 

In a recent article published by The Daily Beast, its Washington bureau chief, Howard Kurtz, reasoned that if “moderate” Mitt Romney wins the Republican nomination for President, he’ll need to choose a running mate with the conservative bona fides to balance the ticket.

 

Last week, President Barack Obama, at a Capital Hilton fundraising event, told the crowd, "We can't go back to this brand of you're-on-your-own economics." Throughout my professional career as an economist, I've never come across the theory of "you're-on-your-own economics." I'm guessing what the President means by — and finds offensive in — "you're-on-your-own economics" is that it's a system in which people are held responsible for their actions, that they take risks and must live with the results, that people can't force others to pay for their mistakes, and that they can't live at the expense of other people.

 

While the Family Research Council’s Tony Perkins crowed about a “consensus” vote for GOP presidential candidate Rick Santorum at the special evangelical con-fab called in Texas to choose the Christian candidate preferred over Mitt Romney, not all the faithful were in agreement that Santorum has the intellectual and political prowess to defeat Barack Obama.

 

Last Friday, two pro-business organizations filed motions in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, challenging the constitutionality of President Barack Obama’s recess appointments. The two advocacy groups, the National Right to Work Foundation (NRWF) and the National Federation of Independent Business (NFIB), argue in their pleading that as the Senate was in session, the Constitution does not empower the President to make appointments without their advice and consent.

 

The Republican presidential race has become a hot potato for the American electorate, as revealing campaign ads and heated presidential debates underscore the records and credentials of the remaining GOP candidates. Many of the recent campaign controversies, particularly over so-called "attack ads" — which are often just marketing campaigns that highlight a candidate’s record — have led to a political witch-hunt that has stamped the newly minted "Super PAC" with a big fat corruption label.

 

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