Though a number of Republicans across the country have been calling for New Jersey Governor Chris Christie to throw his hat into the presidential ring, he has continually rejected the call and has sworn to finish out his gubernatorial term. Christie’s assertions have done little to decrease the public call for a presidential consideration, but perhaps a recent announcement by the Republican Governors Association will finally put an end to those calls. Christie has been elected vice chairman of the Republican Governors Association, providing a more concrete indication that Christie will not be running for President in 2012.

The RGA made the announcement yesterday morning, while also announcing that Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker will serve on the RGA’s executive committee.

RGA chairman Bob McDonnell said of the recent moves, “No governors better exemplify the type of leadership our country needs right now than Governors Chris Christie and Scott Walker.”

A 35-year-old Navy veteran, Luis Lebron, is suing the state of Florida over its policy that all welfare applicants be drug tested prior to receiving benefits. The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), America’s legislative lobbying and litigation artisans whose stated mission is "to defend and preserve the individual rights and liberties guaranteed to every person in this country by the Constitution and laws of the United States," will be representing Lebron.

The Orlando resident is currently pursuing an accounting degree at the University of Central Florida, while taking care of his four-year-old son and mentally disabled mother. One of many victims of the Great Recession, Lebron was laid off in 2008, and has been unable to find another job since. After exhausting his veteran’s benefits, he applied earlier this summer for welfare benefits.

"It made me feel really bad; I just felt like everything was caving in on me," Lebron lamented. "I felt like, I served my country for four years; doesn't that mean anything anymore? I've worked for pretty good companies. I'm going to school; I'm supposed to graduate. I shouldn't be in this position."

Liberty lovers across the country will be gathering in Reno, Nevada, from September 15-17 for the 2011 Liberty Political Action Conference. With a variety of educational seminars being offered and the presence of prominent speakers like Texas Congressman and GOP presidential contender Ron Paul, the event should prove to have a major impact on the growing movement for liberty that is characterizing the upcoming presidential race.

According to LPAC’s website:

The Liberty Political Action Conference will play host to freedom activists from across the country. LPAC will feature conservative, libertarian, constitutional, and free market organizations, activists, and businesses. We’ll also bring together tons of exciting personalities and leaders in the liberty movement to discuss sound money, foreign policy, civil liberties, and the Constitutional hot button issues facing the liberty movement today.

Featured speakers include Ron Paul, Senators Rand Paul of Kentucky and Mike Lee of Utah — both of whom are Tea Party favorites — executive director of the National Association for Gun Rights Dudley Brown, Barry Goldwater Jr., John Birch Society CEO Art Thompson, and senior faculty of the Ludwig von Mises Institute Walter Block, as well as many others.

In the days following the attacks of September 11, 2001, the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) began systematically disregarding civil liberties and arresting “suspects” they believed might commit a crime if given the opportunity.

An example of these violations is found in the case of Yassin Aref and Mohammed Hossain.

In 2007, these leaders at a mosque in Albany, New York were sentenced to 15 years in a federal penitentiary for their alleged connection with terrorist organization and their participation in a plot to launder money obtained by selling a missile to a Pakistani militant group known as Jaish-e-Mohammed. The FBI alleged that the two men had conspired to “make money through jihad” by laundering the proceeds of the sale of the shoulder-launched missile.

What the FBI also admitted was that the crimes of which Aref and Hossain were accused, tried, and convicted were “not real” and that there was never any threat to the American people from the supposed conspiracy.
 
According to a story published recently in Harper's Magazine:

As Sarah Palin vacillates between running and not running, many among her Tea Party supporters are growing weary of the drama and are expressing their worry that the former governor of Alaska is merely using their dedication to further her own career and line her own pockets.

One of these groups, the Armed Forces Tea Party Patriots, cites Palin as a perfect example of the kind of political parasite intent on feeding itself on the good will and treasure of those devoted to the patriot movement.

On Tuesday, the Armed Forces Tea Party Patriots issued a press release calling out Palin and similar Tea Party celebrities for hitching themselves to the Tea Party wagon, teasing them with promises of running for office and restoring traditional American values to the halls of government.
 
The Armed Forces Tea Party Patriots organization is composed of former members of the armed services. Their website sets out their mission:

Tony Blankley’s recent column, “Politics Turns Dangerously Rougher,” reflects my own thinking on where all of this conflict between the socialist left and pro-Constitution Tea-Party right is headed. Since the history of socialism is rife with revolutionary violence, and undoubtedly socialist Obama knows that history well, I have feared that the present conflict may be leading us to civil violence. The words of labor leader Hoffa at the Labor Day celebration in Detroit had a dangerous ring. Blankley writes:

Whether Hoffa's words are criminal or not, with words like "terrorist," "lynching," "go to hell," and "take them out," the emerging tone of the Democratic Party regarding the Tea Party is ominous. It is the language of murderous violence, and it is targeted at a specific group of people. Most disturbing is the failure of the Democratic Party leaders to condemn such language — including Chairman of the Democratic National Committee Debbie Wasserman Schultz -—  who on national television specifically and repeatedly evaded any comment on Hoffa's statement.

Thus far, we have heard no repudiation of Hoffa’s intemperance from any high-ranking Democrat. Indeed, Hoffa’s language seems to indicate that the left is not at all averse to using violence to get its way.
 

The National Labor Relations Board’s (NLRB) assault on American manufacturing may soon be arrested. As readers of The New American are aware, in what some have called its “worst decision,” the NLRB unloaded its regulatory arsenal on American aircraft manufacturer Boeing, Inc. and nearly eliminated a thousand jobs -- American jobs -- in the process.
 
With the American economy mired in the contrived quicksand of the Federal Reserve’s boom/bust cycle, Boeing struck out and threw a rope of hope to thousands of American families by opening a new 787 Dreamliner assembly plant in South Carolina. For such an ambitious undertaking, the Chicago-based aerospace and defense company received nearly universal praise. One prominent exception: the federal government in the form of the NLRB.
 
Rather than praise Boeing’s bravery and good will, the NLRB filed a federal lawsuit. The federal agency bared its litigious teeth after being “taunted” by Boeing’s lauding of South Carolina’s industry-friendly “right to work” labor laws.

Florida Governor Rick Scott has looked at the 20,000 administrative rules in the Florida Administrative Code, and he is asking the Florida Legislature in one fell swoop to repeal 1,000 of those rules and to change another 1,200 of the rules.

Scott has tried to create an Office of Fiscal Accountability and Regulatory Reform, which would be required to sign off on all new rules, but the Florida Supreme Court has ruled that this would violate the state’s constitution.

The Florida Supreme Court, however, cannot prevent the Florida Legislature from asserting its power to stop proposed rules from going into effect. Why is Governor Scott doing this? “Every rule costs money. Just the fact that you have to research to find out if you’re in compliance. It’s so complicated that people have to hire consultants to figure out how to comply. Every dime a company spends on regulations is a dime they add to what you care about as a purchaser of a product or service. You hear stories. Why do we have to do this?

Former Massachusetts Governor and 2012 Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney unveiled his economic agenda Tuesday, beating President Barack Obama to the punch by two days. (Obama will present his jobs plan in a speech to a joint session of Congress Thursday evening.) Romney’s plan is, as former Labor Secretary Robert Reich put it, “unremarkable, to say the least.”

To his credit, Romney seems to grasp that the private sector, not government, is the source of American prosperity. In the summary of his agenda found on his website, Romney says that his plan “does not promise the immediate creation of some imaginary number of jobs, because government cannot create jobs — at least not productive ones that contribute to our long-term prosperity. It is economic growth, not government growth, that provides productive opportunities for American workers.” (This did not, however, stop Romney from claiming that his plan would create 11 million jobs during his first four years in office.)

As Texas Governor and GOP frontrunner Rick Perry took criticism from nearly all his rivals at a September 7 GOP presidential debate at the Reagan Library, Perry quipped: "I kinda feel like the Pinata here at the party." But only his fellow Texan, Congressman Ron Paul, got Perry to back down.

Perry took numerous vague barbs from just about all the other candidates in his first debate as a presidential candidate, but Ron Paul got specific. Asked if Perry was "less conservative than meets the eye," Paul responded: "Much more so. Just take the HPV. Forcing 12-year-old girls to take an inoculation to prevent a sexually transmitted disease, this is not good medicine, I do not believe. It's not good social policy."

Paul then proceeded to criticize sharply the method by which Perry created the mandatory vaccines of thousands of Texas pre-teens: "But one of the worst parts about that is the way it was done.

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