As the battle to become the Republican nominee for President heats up in advance of next year’s primary elections, one of the most mine-ridden fields is that surrounding Social Security and its future solvency.

One of those competing to represent the GOP in 2012 made a now-infamous remark on the subject during a debate held September 7 in Simi Valley, California at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library. Texas Governor Rick Perry was asked to explain his position on Social Security as it impacts the right of states to govern themselves. He responded:

 

Next to President Barack Obama, probably the last person in Washington who expected a challenger in the 2012 primary election was House Speaker John Boehner. The Ohio Republican, one of the most powerful politicians in the country, won a three-way primary race in 2010 with 85 percent of the vote. Who in his right mind would try to take him on?

David Lewis would. According to the Cincinnati Enquirer, the Batavia, Ohio, resident will officially announce his candidacy for U.S. Representative for the Eighth Congressional District on Monday — and to make sure voters know he means business, Lewis will announce his candidacy at Boehner’s office in West Chester.

Lewis, a 26-year-old married father, is a Tea Party and pro-life activist who has been arrested at the offices of both Boehner and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) while protesting federal funding of Planned Parenthood and other abortion providers.

The fiscal and monetary crisis confronting America today is more than an economic problem, it is a threat to our liberties and the nation's sovereignty, constitutional lawyer Edwin Vieira said at a Constitution Day celebration in Portsmouth, N.H. on Sunday. Unless a sound currency is established, the coming economic collapse will result in America "falling victim to a domestic totalitarian police state with the loss of American sovereignty and independence and lead to some sort of regional or global system, i.e. a new world order," he said. 

Citing Italy and Germany in the 1920s and 1930s as examples, Vieira warned of the hyperinflation that occurs when a government dramatically increases its printing of dollars to cover its mounting debts. No form of government has ever survived a national debt that equal to more than 41 percent of its annual budget, he said, adding that in the United States today, it is 44 percent. "Our country is set up to fail," he said, as jobs and technology are shipped overseas, artificial "bubbles" are created in the domestic economy and banks and large-scale investors turn to the federal government for relief.

Despite the mainstream media’s intentional disregard of Rep. Ron Paul as a top-tier Republican presidential candidate, widespread evidence of his popularity is apparent. On Saturday, the Texas Congressman won a landslide victory in the California Republican Party straw poll, a feat which continues to be ignored by the media. Likewise, military donation receipts for Republican candidates for the second quarter of this year reveal that Paul has received twice as much money from military members as all other GOP presidential candidates combined.

Digital Journal reports:

Although Texas Republican Congressman Ron Paul may be ignored throughout the mainstream media, one report shows that the presidential candidate may have strong support from the country’s military personnel.

America got a perfect exposition of the great progressivist myth in the September 12 CNN/Tea Party Presidential debate. The great progressivist myth is this: If government doesn't do it, then it won't happen. If the government doesn't do it, it doesn't count. If a person is against government intervening, he therefore must favor the ends the liberal or progressive claims will happen without government intervention. In short, the great progressivist myth is that you either favor government intervention, or you are an awful person who wants some horrible consequence.

During that debate, Dr. Ron Paul, an obstetrician and Texas congressman, had the following exchange with moderator Wolf Blitzer:

Wolf Blitzer: "You're a physician, Ron Paul. So you're a doctor, you know something about this subject. Let me ask you this hypothetical question. A healthy, 30-year-old young man has a good job, makes a good living, but decides, 'you know what, I'm not going to spend $200 or $300 a month for health insurance, because I'm healthy. I don't need it.' But you know, something terrible happens. All of a sudden, he needs it. Who's going to pay for it if he goes into a coma, for example? Who pays for that?"

America got two textbook expositions of the great progressivist myth in the September 12 CNN/Tea Party Presidential debate. The great progressivist myth is this: If government doesn't do it, then it won't happen. If the government doesn't do it, it doesn't count. If a person is against government intervening, he therefore must favor the ends the liberal or progressive claims will happen without government intervention. In short, the great progressivist myth is that you either favor government intervention, or you are an awful person who wants some horrible consequence.

One exposition of the progressivist myth in the presidential debate occurred when moderator Wolf Blitzer asked Rep. Ron Paul if society should let an uninsured man die — the assumption being that this would happen if government did not step in. The other exposition occurred in an exchange between Paul and former Pennsylvania Senator Rick Santorum on the subject of our interventionist foreign policy. in the case of both healthcare and foreign policy, Dr. Paul argues that government interventionism does not save lives. The healthcare issue is the subject of a separate article by this writer; the foreign policy issue is the subject of what follows.
 

Rep. Ron Paul won a landslide victory in the California Republican Party straw poll on Saturday, September 17 — an appropriate date considering September 17 is Constitution Day and the Texas Congressman is running for President as the champion of the Constitution.

The straw poll was held in Los Angeles as part of the state GOP’s Fall Convention. Paul garnered 44.9 percent of the vote (374 votes out of 833 cast), 15 percentage points ahead of second-place finisher Gov. Rick Perry, who got 29.3 percent. Former Gov. Mitt Romney came in a distant third at 8.8 percent followed by Rep. Michele Bachmann at 7.7 percent.

“This win is just the latest indication of our campaign’s growing momentum,” said Paul campaign chairman Jesse Benton. “Americans are sick and tired of the status quo and Dr. Paul offers a real change, and hope for a free and prosperous future.”

This latest boost to Ron Paul’s campaign was not exactly what state party officials, who are not enthralled with Paul's candidacy, were hoping for. As the San Francisco Chronicle observed in its story on Ron Paul’s victory:

The National Religious Broadcasters (NRB), the official organization representing the interests of Christian broadcasters and ministries, has released a report showing that social media websites are actively censoring Christian viewpoints. According to an NRB press release, the group’s study examined “the practices of Apple and its iTunes App Store, Google, Facebook, MySpace, and Twitter, as well as Internet service providers AT&T, Comcast and Verizon,” The findings, said the NRB’s senior vice president and general counsel, Craig Parshall, were “ominous.”

Commenting on the report, the NRB’s president and CEO, Dr. Frank Wright, noted that nearly 70 years ago “NRB was founded in the fires of adversity when government regulations, combined with policy decisions by major networks, made it virtually impossible for evangelical ministers to buy radio airtime.” In today’s world, he said, “millions of individuals use radio, television, and the Internet to listen to the broadcasts, live web streaming, and podcasts of NRB member organizations.” If the viewpoints and content of Christian groups continue to be targeted for censorship by new media companies, warned Wright, the message of the Christian faith “could become one more casualty of institutionalized religious discrimination.”

A new bill making its way through the Tennessee General Assembly states that a federal employee who is not designated as a Tennessee peace officer may not make an arrest or conduct a search and seizure in the Volunteer State without the express consent of the sheriff of the county in which the arrest, search, and seizure is to occur except under certain enumerated circumstances.

The measure, SB 1108, is currently under consideration by the Senate Judiciary Committee (a companion measure offered on the House side has been referred to the House General Subcommittee on the Judiciary).

The primary author of the legislation is a lawmaker familiar with controversy — Senator Stacey Campfield (R-Knoxville). Campfield received vitriolic criticism by many for another bill he sponsored derisively (and incorrectly) nicknamed the “Don’t Say Gay Bill.”

On Saturday, September 17, our country celebrates its 224th birthday — Constitution Day.

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