The National Labor Relations Board’s (NLRB) assault on American manufacturing may soon be arrested. As readers of The New American are aware, in what some have called its “worst decision,” the NLRB unloaded its regulatory arsenal on American aircraft manufacturer Boeing, Inc. and nearly eliminated a thousand jobs -- American jobs -- in the process.
 
With the American economy mired in the contrived quicksand of the Federal Reserve’s boom/bust cycle, Boeing struck out and threw a rope of hope to thousands of American families by opening a new 787 Dreamliner assembly plant in South Carolina. For such an ambitious undertaking, the Chicago-based aerospace and defense company received nearly universal praise. One prominent exception: the federal government in the form of the NLRB.
 
Rather than praise Boeing’s bravery and good will, the NLRB filed a federal lawsuit. The federal agency bared its litigious teeth after being “taunted” by Boeing’s lauding of South Carolina’s industry-friendly “right to work” labor laws.

Florida Governor Rick Scott has looked at the 20,000 administrative rules in the Florida Administrative Code, and he is asking the Florida Legislature in one fell swoop to repeal 1,000 of those rules and to change another 1,200 of the rules.

Scott has tried to create an Office of Fiscal Accountability and Regulatory Reform, which would be required to sign off on all new rules, but the Florida Supreme Court has ruled that this would violate the state’s constitution.

The Florida Supreme Court, however, cannot prevent the Florida Legislature from asserting its power to stop proposed rules from going into effect. Why is Governor Scott doing this? “Every rule costs money. Just the fact that you have to research to find out if you’re in compliance. It’s so complicated that people have to hire consultants to figure out how to comply. Every dime a company spends on regulations is a dime they add to what you care about as a purchaser of a product or service. You hear stories. Why do we have to do this?

Former Massachusetts Governor and 2012 Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney unveiled his economic agenda Tuesday, beating President Barack Obama to the punch by two days. (Obama will present his jobs plan in a speech to a joint session of Congress Thursday evening.) Romney’s plan is, as former Labor Secretary Robert Reich put it, “unremarkable, to say the least.”

To his credit, Romney seems to grasp that the private sector, not government, is the source of American prosperity. In the summary of his agenda found on his website, Romney says that his plan “does not promise the immediate creation of some imaginary number of jobs, because government cannot create jobs — at least not productive ones that contribute to our long-term prosperity. It is economic growth, not government growth, that provides productive opportunities for American workers.” (This did not, however, stop Romney from claiming that his plan would create 11 million jobs during his first four years in office.)

As Texas Governor and GOP frontrunner Rick Perry took criticism from nearly all his rivals at a September 7 GOP presidential debate at the Reagan Library, Perry quipped: "I kinda feel like the Pinata here at the party." But only his fellow Texan, Congressman Ron Paul, got Perry to back down.

Perry took numerous vague barbs from just about all the other candidates in his first debate as a presidential candidate, but Ron Paul got specific. Asked if Perry was "less conservative than meets the eye," Paul responded: "Much more so. Just take the HPV. Forcing 12-year-old girls to take an inoculation to prevent a sexually transmitted disease, this is not good medicine, I do not believe. It's not good social policy."

Paul then proceeded to criticize sharply the method by which Perry created the mandatory vaccines of thousands of Texas pre-teens: "But one of the worst parts about that is the way it was done.

The California Supreme Court will be hearing arguments from gay marriage opponents next week in the Proposition 8 court battle. According to The Blaze, this next stage in the court battle will “shed light on whether the voter-approved measure’s backers have legal authority to appeal the federal ruling that overturned Proposition 8.”

Proposition 8 is a voter-approved ban against same-sex marriage. California residents voted to add the following words to the California state constitution:

Only marriage between a man and a woman is valid or recognized in California.

Proposition 8 was written in exactly the same way as California’s Proposition 22, which, as an ordinary statute, was invalidated by the State Supreme Court.

At one of last month's Congressional Black Caucus-sponsored "job fairs," Rep. Andre Carson, D-Ind., told the audience: "This is the effort that we're seeing of Jim Crow. Some of these folks in Congress right now would love to see us as second-class citizens. Some of them in Congress right now with this tea party movement would love to see you and me — I'm sorry, Tamron — hanging on a tree." Carson's reference to Tamron was acknowledgment of the presence of MSNBC's black reporter Tamron Hall, who didn't deem it fit to report the congressman's statement.

Another black attacker of the tea party movement is Rep. Maxine Waters, who told her constituents: "This is a tough game. You can't be intimidated. You can't be frightened. And as far as I'm concerned, the tea party can go straight to hell." "Let us all remember who the real enemy is. And the real enemy is the tea party," reminded Rep. Frederica Wilson, D-Fla. The Rev. Jesse Jackson said the tea party should be called the "Fort Sumter tea party that sought to maintain states' rights and slavery." Rep. Alcee Hastings, D-Fla., in telling a job fair audience to register to vote, said, "Turn the tea party upside down!"

Communists have warred against Christians since Lenin and Trotsky first imposed Karl Marx’s horrific nonsense on reality. Whether it was the Soviet Union’s exiling of converts to mental hospitals and the gulag or Castro’s beating of Cuban believers, Romania’s 13-year imprisonment and torture of Richard Wurmbrand or China’s fierce retribution against unofficial “house churches,” the State fears Christianity’s inherent enmity. And it abuses Christ’s followers accordingly.

Biblical Christianity cannot help but oppose government: the principles and forces that animate the two conflict irreconcilably. Christianity sees each person, no matter how insignificant, helpless, or sinful, as a being of infinite value, created in Jehovah’s image and worth His Son’s agonizing sacrifice.

It also recognizes and respects the free will God grants every one of these immortal souls — free will the Almighty Himself honors in this present world. Certainly, “every knee should bow … and every tongue should confess that Jesus Christ is Lord,” but here on earth, men are free to accept or reject the Gospel, to bow humbly before their Creator or to shake their fist in His face.

The newsprint chronicling Texas governor Rick Perry’s dedication to the Siamese principles of corporate welfare and cronyism continue to pile up. As documented earlier in The New American, during his time in Austin, Rick Perry has shown unrivaled and unashamed favoritism to the largest supporters of his campaigns.

One of the most egregious beneficiaries of Rick Perry’s largesse (and one receiving a lion’s share of the media’s scrutiny) is an economic development program developed by Perry called the Texas Emerging Technology Fund.

This pet project was founded by Perry to act as a state government-controlled version of a venture capital firm. The Texas Emerging Technology Fund would act as an angel -— bestowing financial boons on technology-based start-up companies in the Lone Star State.

No one was home when the FBI began visiting the Mayfield residence in Aloha, Oregon, a suburb of Portland, early in the spring of 2004. The agents did, however, see plenty of Brandon Mayfield, a Portland lawyer, his Egyptian-born wife, Mona, and their three children. According to court records, the agents had been following the Muslim family to and from their mosque, at the children’s schools, and at various family activities. They obtained from the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court what is commonly called a “sneak and peek” warrant that permits the search of property without notifying the suspect party until six months later. Investigators planted electronic listening devices in the “shared and intimate” rooms of the Mayfield home and in Mayfield’s law offices. They photographed files and downloaded hard drives. They placed wiretaps on both home and office phones. The application for the FISC order was personally approved by John Ashcroft, then the Attorney General of the United States. Why was our government so interested Mayfield’s files, activities, and conversations? A U.S. citizen born in Kansas, Mayfield is a convert to the Muslim faith. He was aware that the FBI had been investigating Muslims in the Portland area, particularly a group that became known as “The Portland Six,” whose members were convicted on money-laundering and weapons charges related to their efforts in support of the Taliban fighting U.S. and allied forces in Afghanistan. One of them, Jeffrey Battles, had retained Mayfield as his lawyer in a child custody case.

JBS is a proud cosponsor of LPAC 2011 in Reno on Sept. 15-17.

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