Just two days separated a letter from Matt Taibbi of Rolling Stone magazine and a report from the president of the Dallas Federal Reserve, each remarkably calling for the end of “too big to fail” (TBTF) banks.

The rising oil production from North Dakota’s Bakken Formation now equals that of Alaska’s Prudhoe Bay for the first time, according to the Wall Street Journal, due to technological breakthroughs such as fracking.

Tax Armageddon, or "Taxmageddon," looms on the horizon, as $500 billion in tax cuts will all be expiring at the end of the year. While Americans were hustling on April 17 to complete their taxes, experts were warning about a much larger tax day — January 1, 2013. And if Congress doesn’t take action, American households will be hit with an average tax hike of $3,800, according to the Heritage Foundation.

Last November, President Obama stood before an audience and said government needs to be “responsive to the needs of people, not the needs of special interests.” He added, “That is probably the biggest piece of business that remains unfinished.”

A sugar-coated analysis of the global economy released by the International Monetary Fund April 17 nevertheless contains dire warnings about a world in a looming global government bond crisis.

Defense Secretary Leon Panetta acknowledged Monday that his numerous flights home to California, which have cost taxpayers about $860,000, may have been a little excessive. Despite his purported regret, however, he indicated that his weekend trips  — which have tallied to nearly 30 times since July — will not end. He told reporters that he is open to "alternatives here that I can look at, that might possibly be able to save funds and, at the same time, be able to fulfill my responsibilities not only to my job but to my family."

 
 

 The U.S. General Services Administration official responsible for a $822,000 Las Vegas party on the tab of the U.S. taxpayer refused to answer any questions before the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform April 16, followed by hand-wringing by former GSA head Martha Johnson. Hearings also revealed that the GSA employees may have stolen iPods purchased for an employee incentive program.

 
 

Campaigning to make economic “fairness” the central theme of his reelection campaign, President Obama on April 10 pitched his “Buffett Rule” tax hike to a student audience at Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton.

 
 

The United States spends more on K-12 education than many other developed countries, but with results so poor that inadequate education threatens national security, according to a study sponsored by the New York-based Council on Foreign Relations. 

 
 

Despite the fact that in 2011 President Barack Obama paid a lower tax rate than his secretary — the very circumstance Obama hopes to rectify with the so-called “Buffett Rule” — the President refuses to send one penny more than the law requires to the U.S. Treasury this year, his chief campaign strategist told Fox News Sunday.

 
 
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