The United States spends more on K-12 education than many other developed countries, but with results so poor that inadequate education threatens national security, according to a study sponsored by the New York-based Council on Foreign Relations. 

 
 

Despite the fact that in 2011 President Barack Obama paid a lower tax rate than his secretary — the very circumstance Obama hopes to rectify with the so-called “Buffett Rule” — the President refuses to send one penny more than the law requires to the U.S. Treasury this year, his chief campaign strategist told Fox News Sunday.

 
 

Apparently the soaring national debt and the threat of a nuclear Iran are not enough to occupy the government's time, because the Obama administration is pushing to force Westchester County, N.Y., to create more low-income housing, in order to mix and match classes and races to fit the government's preconceptions.

 
 

 Beacon Power, the beneficiary of the endless flow of taxpayer guarantees emanating from the Department of Energy, went into bankruptcy in just over two years, leaving lawyers from the Justice Department crying foul.

 
 

The Food Network broadcast a documentary “Hunger Hits Home” April 14 that exaggerated the level of childhood hunger in the United States by at least a factor of 20.

 
 

When Hostess Brands, maker of Wonder Bread, Twinkies, and Ding Dongs, declared bankruptcy on January 12, it said it can’t make interest payments on its $860 million of outstanding debt and make payments into its unions’ pension plans as well. So it stopped making the pension plan contributions.

 
 

As free market-based digital currencies like Bitcoin and e-gold continue to gain traction around the world, the government of Canada responded with the “MintChip,” an electronic payment system touted by authorities as “better than cash” and the “evolution of currency.” Critics of the scheme, however, were not so enthusiastic about the accelerating march toward a cashless society. 

 
 

On Monday, April 16, the U.S. Senate is scheduled to vote on a procedural motion intended to move the so-called Buffett Rule forward. The motion, if agreed to by at least 60 votes, would invoke "cloture," stopping a Republican filibuster and allowing the Senate to proceed to a vote on the Buffett Rule itself.

 
 

Arghhh! It just happened again. No, I’m not referring to the billions of dollars hard-working taxpayers will have to send to Uncle Sam by April 17. (We get an extra two days to file a return this year, thanks to the 15th falling on a Sunday and the 16th being a holiday in Washington, D.C..)

 
 

The government doled out more than $200,000 in 2010 to "translocate" a bush that was blocking the path of San Francisco’s $1.05-billion highway project — partially funded by President Obama’s 2009 economic stimulus law — adding to the laundry list of "shovel-ready" projects that resulted in a cesspool of taxpayer waste.

 
 
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