It's not like the old days in China when the top guys in the Communist Party at least pretended to be pro-equality.  Back then, "poor peasants" were encouraged to denounce and kill "rich peasants" for the crime of being too productive, too individualistic, or insufficiently enthusiastic about self-sacrifice.

Today in Australia there's a mansion, overlooking Sydney Harbor, that recently sold for $32.4 million. Its new owner is Zeng Wei, 43, the son of Zeng Qinghong, once one of the most powerful men in the Chinese Communist Party.

 

As the year 2011 has witnessed an inordinate number of protests, particularly in the state of Wisconsin, Governor Scott Walker of Wisconsin has proposed a number of steps to restrict certain displays of opposition in his state. Walker has indicated that he wants to introduce a fee to protestors who wish to demonstrate.

The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reported last week, “Gov. Scott Walker’s administration could hold demonstrators at the Capitol liable for the cost of extra police or cleanup and repairs after protests, under a new policy unveiled Thursday.”

According to the policy, groups of four or more people must first obtain permits before conducting any activity or display in state buildings, and must obtain those permits at least 72 hours in advance of any event. The rules regulating displays outside of the Capitol indicate that a permit is required for 100 or more people. There is some wiggle room for spontaneous gatherings in the wake of unforeseen events.
 

Mainland China remains Communist China. Marxism, or perhaps Maoism, remains the political philosophy of government in this giant nation. Although Marxism has been a resounding failure everywhere it has been tried — except, of course, for the party elites — communists still propound the virtues of their system. One of those virtues is that the “dictatorship of the proletariat” means that strikes do not exist under communism because the workers hold power.

Someone forgot to tell the workers at the Hi-P International plant in Shanghai. More than 200 of these workers have gone on strike, and the strike entered its third day on December 2. The workers were chanting slogans and carrying banners that demanded answers from management. The strike was principally prompted by fears of big layoffs, and it was part of more general labor unrest in China.

Thousands of workers have gone on strike or begun work stoppages at factories that are part of China’s export industries. This has interrupted the supply of such products as shoes, bras, watches, and electronic equipment. The companies claim to operate on a razor thin profit margin and that there is no room for pay hikes, and, indeed, the workforces in some facilities may be reduced.

Top Masonic leaders met with the heads of European Union institutions to discuss spreading “democracy” and human rights in Europe and throughout the EU’s so-called “neighborhood,” according to a press release issued by the Brussels-based emerging continental government. Critics of the supranational regime, meanwhile, pointed out the irony of unelected regional rulers discussing democracy — especially after the EU-backed overthrow of democratically elected leaders in Italy and Greece in recent weeks.

The November 30 meeting, "A partnership for democracy and shared prosperity: a common willingness to promote democratic rights and liberties," was hosted by EU Commission President José Manuel Barroso, a former underground Maoist leader in Portugal before adopting a more moderate stance and entering the political world. Among the EU officials in attendance at the gathering were European Parliament President Jerzy Buzek and EU Council President Herman Van Rompuy.

"Building a future based on democracy, pluralism, the rule of law, human rights and social justice is a task and ambition of the European Union, and much still remains to be done, not only in the neighborhood of the European Union, but in our own countries, too,” Commission President Barroso said in a statement. “I am glad to see that participants share a deep concern for the promotion of those values which are and have to remain at the core of the European project."

Economist and conservative commentator Don Boudreaux attended the opening of the Institute for Justice (IJ) on September 10, 1991, and thought to himself at that time that “it sounded like a good idea.” Looking back at what IJ has accomplished since then, Boudreaux says, “IJ’s success over the past two decades is nothing short of phenomenal.”

At the ceremony marking the beginning of IJ, co-founder Clint Bolick spelled out exactly what they intended to do, and recognized the enormous changes in the way of their doing it. IJ is going to be focused, he said, on “removing barriers to opportunity and helping low-income people earn their share of the American Dream.” For instance:

Little Devon Williams, who was able to escape the cesspool of the Milwaukee Public Schools and instead get a good education in an excellent neighborhood private school, thanks to the nation's first real parental choice program. I tell you, the inspiration, the look of joy and optimism on their faces, speak volumes to the fact that we are right, and that we must persevere in these efforts that are only barely begun….

Each of us possesses fundamental rights that no government may take away. If any of us loses our rights, we all lose our rights. And if [anyone] does not have liberty, then none of us has liberty. We have so much work to do.

JBS CEO Art Thompson's weekly video news update for December 5-December 11, 2011.

After years of contentious feuding, Boeing and the machinists union announced Wednesday that they’d reached a tentative four-year contract extension on a collective bargaining agreement. If finalized, the deal would boost wages for union workers, issue bonuses, improve pension benefits, and likely preserve operations at a new $750 million plant in Charleston, South Carolina, a right-to-work state where Boeing jumpstarted a new production line for its 787 airplane.

Acting on a complaint by the machinists union, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) cast a politically charged lawsuit at Boeing in April, contending that the aerospace company usurped labor laws by launching the production line in South Carolina, rather than Washington state. The agency alleged that Boeing had introduced the line to punish union workers for past strikes, which the NLRB deemed illegal retaliation against workers exercising their right to strike and bargain collectively.

Also part of the Boeing-union deal is a guarantee to manufacture a new, more fuel-efficient airplane, the 737 Max, at facilities in Renton, Washington, which is located near Seattle. Union leaders said they are pleased with the deal and have issued assurances that if it reaches final approval, the union will ask the NLRB to drop the case. "If this agreement is ratified, we will engage the government in discussion and inform them that our issues with the Boeing Company are behind us," assured Tom Wroblewski, president of District Lodge 751, which represents 28,000 workers in the Puget Sound area.

Thursday was a big day for the U.S. Senate, which stayed in session later than usual to attend to a few significant items, such as the controversial National Defense Authorization Act, which passed, and two competing payroll tax cut bills, both of which failed. The payroll tax cut bills marked a role reversal for the two parties, as it was the Democrats pushing for the cuts and the Republicans who stood in opposition to them, demanding that the cuts be paid for without raising taxes.

The votes on the tax cut bills were apparently symbolic ones so that politicians from both parties can laud their own efforts and lambaste their opponents in the upcoming 2012 election.

The Democratic plan would have both extended and expanded the payroll tax cut, reducing the Social Security payroll tax to 3.1 percent, even further than the present tax cut that is due to expire, but Republicans opposed the plan because it required a new tax to be imposed on the "wealthy" in order to cover the $110 billion in lost revenues.

The Democratic measure lost by a vote of 51 to 49. As observed by the Christian Science Monitor, “For the first time, a Republican, Susan Collins of Maine, voted to support the millionaires’ surcharge.”

When Newt Gingrich was asked in the November 9 CNBC presidential debate what he did to earn $300,000 from mortgage giant Freddie Mac, Gingrich claimed: "I said to them at the time, this is a bubble. This is insane. This is impossible." But the Wall Street Journal reported December 1 that Gingrich had not only praised the Freddie Mac model in a 2007 interview on the mortgage giant's website but said that "these are results I think conservatives should embrace and want to extend as widely as possible."

The interview with Gingrich is no longer available on the Freddie Mac website, but it is available on several Internet archive websites that capture what websites used to post.

The Wall Street Journal story noted that "The interview was published by Freddie Mac as part of a regular campaign to educate the public — and Washington — about its brand." And by "educate the public," the Wall Street Journal meant promote the continuance of its policy of accelerating the housing bubble.

In the April 24, 2007 interview with Gingrich, the former House Speaker had the following praise for Freddie Mac and the whole GSE (Government-Sponsored Enterprise) concept:

Although the socialists took a beating in Spain’s election on November 20 — in which the conservative Popular Party won a majority of seats in Spain’s parliament — the Spanish Socialist Workers Party (PSOE), with its lowest vote in 34 years, vowed to put real pressure on the new conservative government.

The polls had predicted the victory of the conservative Popular Party, which prompted the leftist candidate, former Interior Minister Alfredo Pérez Rubalcaba, to promise that he would make the rich pay higher taxes. (Where have we heard that before?) He tried to scare voters by claiming that the conservatives had a secret program to cut the welfare state and attack unions and workers' rights. (Echoes of Madison, Wisconsin.) But only 40 percent of the people who had voted for the PSOE in 2008 said they would vote socialist again.

 

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