What is certain is that an implosion in Europe's debt crisis is reaching the point of inevitability in much the same manner that the housing bubble came to a head and burst in the United States, but though no one knows when the debt crisis will come to a head, events are happening in September that may push the eurozone over a fiscal cliff.

Moving forward with President Obama’s environmental agenda, the White House is expected to authorize new federal auto standards in the coming weeks that will nearly double fuel economy requirements for vehicles by 2025. The regulations require “fleet wide” gas mileage of 54.4 miles per gallon, or the average fuel economy for all cars, vans, trucks and other vehicles.

 As the U.S. Congress moves to grant Russia with permanent normal trade relations status, the Russian Federation continues its Cold War style naval expansion of ships and bases abroad and alliance with Syria.

 

The class warfare rhetoric that accompanies the tax debate is reigniting as congressional lawmakers battle over how to address a pending increase of the estate tax, also known as “the death tax.” The current rate of the tax, which is imposed on the transfer of the estate upon an individual’s death, is a component of President George W. Bush’s tax cuts that are slated to expire at the end of the year.

President Obama’s “you didn’t build that” comment has become a top campaign issue. Romney called Obama’s remark “extraordinarily revealing,” an unveiling of “an ideology that somehow says it’s the collective and government that we need to celebrate.” The Obama campaign claims that the remark is being taken out of context.

In the process of providing the world with improved transportation, Henry Ford accelerated the automotive industry, was a factor in the United States’ industrial growth and provided us a “freedom machine.”

The Consumer Product Safety Commission is trying to force Buckyballs desk toys off the market over safety concerns, but the manufacturer is fighting back.

In an effort to curb an array of new regulations, House Republicans passed a bill Thursday that would shackle major federal rules until the national unemployment rate falls to six percent. Authored by Rep. Tim Griffin (R-Ark.), the legislation hones in on excessive or poorly-written rules that could halt job growth and impose burdensome costs on American businesses.

The fines imposed on Barclays Bank by the British Financial Services Authority represent just the beginning of the exposure of the international banking cartel's efforts to keep interest rates low.

 

Neither of the country’s main political parties has a plan to dramatically lower healthcare costs and extend medical services to all of the needy. The author, a physician who practices medicine in New Jersey, has such a plan.

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