As some totalitarian-minded governments escalate their attacks on parental rights and homeschooling, the Vatican’s delegation to the United Nations called on the world to respect families, the rights of parents to direct the upbringing of their children, and non-governmental forms of education. The Holy See’s representatives also called on UN member governments last week to stop indoctrinating the youth.

Last Thursday the Department of Labor withdrew a regulation proposed last September that would have imposed stringent rules on farm labor.

As President Obama and his GOP presidential rivals continue to pound the campaign trail, the grave issue of student loan debt has come under the spotlight. In what critics are calling the next "debt bomb," total student loan debt is slated to top a record $1 trillion, an amount larger than total U.S. credit-card debt and only second to the nation’s overall mortgage debt.

If you want to know why American popular culture has become so strange and raunchy, it’s because we have a new popular religion that now also permeates public education: Nihilism, or Nothingism. Its holy scripture is Rolling Stone magazine, where writers use the “F” word and other similar repulsive expressions routinely in its pages.

More than half of college students graduating this June can expect to find either no work, or work that doesn’t utilize their freshly minted skills, according to the Associated Press.

 

President Barack Obama, a Democrat, wants Congress to extend a student loan interest rate cut set to expire in July; Mitt Romney, the odds-on favorite to head the Republican ticket opposing Obama in November, agrees. Florida Sen. Marco Rubio, a Republican considered a likely running mate for Romney, is pushing a bill that would allow young illegal immigrants to remain in the United States legally under certain conditions; Romney refuses to say whether he supports it despite having privately endorsed it. What gives?

On April 20, 1999, two all-American boys, Eric Harris, 18, and Dylan Klebold, 17, born and bred in the greatest, freest, most prosperous nation on earth, perpetrated the greatest massacre in an American high school. They had intended to kill a thousand students by placing two bombs in the school cafeteria timed to go off during the height of the lunch period. They planned to sit in their cars in the parking lot, watch the building explode, and intended to kill any students who tried to flee from the inferno. But their plans went awry. The two bombs, hidden in two duffle bags, never went off, but the two teenage monsters managed to kill 12 students and a teacher.

 
 

 As it has over the past 15 years, the aggressively pro-homosexual Gay, Lesbian, and Straight Education Network (GLSEN) rolled out its self-serving Day of Silence, supposedly meant to protest the oppression and “bullying” GLSEN insists “gay” young people face. By remaining silent the entire day, explained GLSEN’s director Eliza Byard, students in high schools across the nation are “calling attention to the silencing effects of anti-LGBT [lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender] bullying, discrimination, and harassment present in too many schools across the country.”

A new law in Arizona will allow public schools to teach the Bible as an elective course. On April 17 Republican Governor Jan Brewer signed H.B. 2563 into law, paving the way for the course that will explore the Bible’s profound influence on America’s history and culture.

A California group is attempting to overturn a law requiring state school social studies curriculums to include positive portrayals of homosexuals. Signed into law last year by Governor Jerry Brown, the Fair, Accurate, Inclusive and Respectful (FAIR) Education Act (S.B. 48) requires that “lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender Americans are included and recognized for their important historical contributions to the economic, political, and social development of California, and … that discriminatory bias and negative stereotypes based on sexual orientation are prohibited in school activities and instruction, and instructional materials,” read a synopsis of the legislation by its chief sponsor, State Senator Mark Leno.

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