President Barack Obama, a Democrat, wants Congress to extend a student loan interest rate cut set to expire in July; Mitt Romney, the odds-on favorite to head the Republican ticket opposing Obama in November, agrees. Florida Sen. Marco Rubio, a Republican considered a likely running mate for Romney, is pushing a bill that would allow young illegal immigrants to remain in the United States legally under certain conditions; Romney refuses to say whether he supports it despite having privately endorsed it. What gives?

On April 20, 1999, two all-American boys, Eric Harris, 18, and Dylan Klebold, 17, born and bred in the greatest, freest, most prosperous nation on earth, perpetrated the greatest massacre in an American high school. They had intended to kill a thousand students by placing two bombs in the school cafeteria timed to go off during the height of the lunch period. They planned to sit in their cars in the parking lot, watch the building explode, and intended to kill any students who tried to flee from the inferno. But their plans went awry. The two bombs, hidden in two duffle bags, never went off, but the two teenage monsters managed to kill 12 students and a teacher.

 
 

 As it has over the past 15 years, the aggressively pro-homosexual Gay, Lesbian, and Straight Education Network (GLSEN) rolled out its self-serving Day of Silence, supposedly meant to protest the oppression and “bullying” GLSEN insists “gay” young people face. By remaining silent the entire day, explained GLSEN’s director Eliza Byard, students in high schools across the nation are “calling attention to the silencing effects of anti-LGBT [lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender] bullying, discrimination, and harassment present in too many schools across the country.”

A new law in Arizona will allow public schools to teach the Bible as an elective course. On April 17 Republican Governor Jan Brewer signed H.B. 2563 into law, paving the way for the course that will explore the Bible’s profound influence on America’s history and culture.

A California group is attempting to overturn a law requiring state school social studies curriculums to include positive portrayals of homosexuals. Signed into law last year by Governor Jerry Brown, the Fair, Accurate, Inclusive and Respectful (FAIR) Education Act (S.B. 48) requires that “lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender Americans are included and recognized for their important historical contributions to the economic, political, and social development of California, and … that discriminatory bias and negative stereotypes based on sexual orientation are prohibited in school activities and instruction, and instructional materials,” read a synopsis of the legislation by its chief sponsor, State Senator Mark Leno.

A Georgia kindergarten student was handcuffed and arrested for throwing a temper tantrum in school on Friday, Macon’s WMAZ-TV reports.

 
 

The United States spends more on K-12 education than many other developed countries, but with results so poor that inadequate education threatens national security, according to a study sponsored by the New York-based Council on Foreign Relations. 

 
 

Had eight-year-old Stephen Nalepa not been shown a movie about suicide in his second-grade class on March 23, 1990, he would now be 22 years old and probably enjoying life as a young adult. But, apparently, the educators at his elementary school decided to show the film to these second-graders to see what would happen.

 
 
 
 

An unmarried female teacher who was fired from her position at a Christian school in Texas after she became pregnant said she intends to sue the school for violating her employment rights. Cathy Samford, who worked as a science teacher and volleyball coach at Heritage Christian Academy in Rockwall, Texas, was let go for violating the school’s morality code, which requires staff members to abide by biblical principles in their lifestyle — including abstaining from sex outside of marriage.

 
 

A new Tennessee law, passed without the signature of Republican Governor Bill Haslam, will allow the teaching and discussion of creation theory alongside evolution in the state’s science classrooms. While Haslam did not veto the bill, he did not sign it into law either, citing concerns he had over its possible negative impact on science curriculums.

 
 
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