What made America one of the greatest nations on earth? Can its citizens rediscover that greatness before their nation is overcome by mediocrity, selfishness, and sin? In the new film Monumental: In Search of America’s National Treasure, premiering March 27 for one night in over 550 theaters nationwide, former Hollywood actor (now a Christian apologist) Kirk Cameron takes a look back at the generations that founded America to determine what special characteristics they had that gave the nation its momentum toward greatness and prosperity. He also looks at where the nation stands today to try to determine if its people can reach back and re-embrace the qualities that made America a shining light for the world.

 

Spring is here, and all across America homeschool conventions are sprouting like mushrooms in virtually every state in the Union. And with each passing year, these mushrooms have grown larger and larger to the point where they require the biggest convention centers in their respective states. There are hundreds of vendors and exhibitors at these conventions offering a plethora of educational programs for parents seeking the best for their children, plus instructive workshops, and knowledgeable, charismatic speakers.

Constitutionalists and free-market economists claim that the idea that every high school graduate is entitled to a government-subsidized loan to attend a $30,000-a-year university is fiscally maniacal. But unfortunately, it’s also a fiscal reality that has propelled college graduates into financial Armageddon.

 

The U.S. Supreme Court has declined a religious discrimination case filed by a pair of Christian groups at San Diego State University. In 2005 Alpha Delta Chi, a Christian sorority at the school, and Alpha Gamma Omega-Epsilon, a Christian fraternity, challenged the university’s “non-discrimination” policy requiring that in order to receive campus recognition and funding, Christian student groups could not require members to sign a statement of faith — a rule the groups contend opens the door for individuals with non-Christian views to hold leadership positions.

 

As homeschooling families continue to flee Sweden in the face of escalating persecution, the global outcry over the controversial Swedish policies is growing louder. More than a few critics and reporters have even blasted the government’s actions and behavior as reminiscent of the former Soviet Union.

 

When parents are told that their child is having a “reading problem” in primary school, they usually accept the teacher’s explanation that little Johnny or Suzie have some sort of learning disability. The fact that these little rambunctious kids came to school having taught themselves to speak their own language is proof positive that they don’t have a learning disability.

Many years ago, I learned of an episode in the life of a promising young black man that is relevant to things happening now. He had been educated at a good school, and went on to receive degrees at good colleges and universities. Then he went for a Ph.D. in mathematics at one of the leading departments in that field.

 

As the Federal Reserve came under increasing scrutiny by outraged lawmakers and the public in recent years, it hired a lobbyist to defend its controversial secrecy and produced propaganda-filled comic books aimed at young children. It even sought to develop a tool to spy on concerned citizens over the Internet.

 
 
 

It took a lawsuit filed by the Alliance Defense Fund (ADF) to convince the Fairfax County (Virginia) school district to reinstate an honors student into good standing with the district’s National Honor Society (NHS). The senior at Alexandria’s Jefferson High School for Science and Technology had been threatened with removal from the prestigious national group after being denied community service credit for teaching and mentoring children at her church.

Millennials and Generation Xers have adopted a reputation for being environmental idealists, but according to a new analysis, young Americans are less interested in becoming those "green" warriors that many have presumed them to be. Published this month by the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, the study compiled an analysis of surveys spanning four decades, and resolved that conserving resources and becoming more environmentally conscious are less important to young Americans than they were to their elders.

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