If you are a conservative, a Christian, a libertarian or just a concerned parent and have children in the public schools, you need to attend a homeschool convention. You have to know that there is a wonderful alternative to the government school where children are being deliberately dumbed down in order to serve an increasingly perverse authoritarian state. And when you come away from that convention you’ll know why your child deserves something better than public-school politically correct indoctrination.

If you live in Southern California you can attend CHEA’s 28th Annual Convention on July 14, 15 and 16, 2011, at the Pasadena Convention Center in Pasadena. CHEA is short for Christian Home Educators of California. They have a website with all the information you may need. They have great speakers this year.

California state legislators recently passed a bill that would make theirs the first state to require public schools to include a social studies curriculum on the contributions of gays and lesbians. Governor Jerry Brown has 12 days to sign or veto the measure.

In a 23-14 vote, the California Senate passed the bill. It then moved on to the Assembly, where it passed on a 49 to 25 vote. The Blaze wrote of the measure, proposed by Democratic Senator Mark Leno:

The state Senate has approved legislation that would require California’s public schools to include gay history in social studies lessons. Supporters say the move is needed to counter anti-gay stereotypes and beliefs that make gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender children vulnerable to bullying and suicide. It leaves it up to local school districts to decide what to include in the lessons and at what grade students would receive them.

The reintroduced DREAM Act is worse than the original that was defeated in 2010, Republican Sen. Jeff Sessions says, noting that most of what people think about the idea is false.

Not least of the misperceptions, thanks to leftist propaganda, is that the bill, S. 952, applies almost exclusively to illegal aliens who are “children” and those of good moral character. It doesn’t. It applies to adults, including felons.

In other words, Sen. Dick Durbin, the leftist Democrat from Illinois, and force behind the reincarnation of this amnesty, is lying about it.

Minnesota’s Anoka-Hennepin school district (Anoka Middle School for the Arts) is battling legal efforts to force it to abandon an official policy of neutrality concerning homosexuality. Two liberal legal groups, the Southern Policy Law Center (SPLC) and the National Center for Lesbian Rights (NCLR) recently contacted the district, one of the largest in the Minneapolis area, threatening a lawsuit on behalf of clients they said had faced harassment and abuse as a result of the district’s policy.

The district’s neutrality policy states that “Anoka-Hennepin staff, in the course of their professional duties, shall remain neutral on matters regarding sexual orientation including but not limited to student led discussions. If and when staff address sexual orientation, it is important that staff do so in a respectful manner that is age-appropriate, factual, and pertinent to the relevant curriculum.”
 

Is America still a free country? Many of us like to think so. Yes, we can get into a car and drive wherever we want. But the high cost of gas now prevents us from taking the longer trips we’d like to take. We can still go to the mall and buy whatever we want, even though prices have gone up. We can still read whatever we want, and we can say whatever we want. But when it comes to education, suddenly we are confronted with compulsory school attendance laws, compulsory property taxes to pay for the government schools, compulsory testing, compulsory inoculations, forced busing, restrictions against prayer, forced sex ed, death ed, and drug ed. And now, every day over four million children are forced to take Ritalin, a powerful mind- and mood-altering drug, if they want to attend the government school.

Most people take the alphabet for granted. It has been a part of our culture and civilization for so long that most of us haven't the faintest idea of how or where it originated. Yet the idea of using abstract symbols — which we call letters — to stand for the speech sounds of a language is one of the greatest intellectual inventions in all of human history. Prior to the widespread use of the alphabet, the earliest known form of writing was pictography. Ancient scribes drew pictures on the walls of their caves, and in that primitive way they were able to communicate some simple stories. The pictures looked like the things they represented. An animal looked like an animal. A human being looked like a human being. A tree looked like a tree. You didn't have to go to school to be able to "read" these pictographs.

The other day I was having dinner at a friend's house and was chatting with his 12-year-old daughter who attends a local public school. I asked her how she was doing, and she told me that she hated school -— not merely disliked school, but hated it.

I told her I thought I knew why she hated school -— because it was boring. "Yes," she replied. It was boring. And then I said, "And you're probably not learning much also."
She wanted to know what I meant by that. So I asked her to name the first three wars that the United States was involved with. She got the first one right, the Revolutionary War. But the only other war she could think of was the Civil War, and she had no idea when that took place.

The full-blown insanity of feminism may have found its fullest expression at a Swedish pre-school, according to a news report, where the teachers have banned the use of "him" and "her" to describe boys and girls and men and women.

The leftist school, the Daily Mail reports, has adopted a "genderless" vocabulary, it says, so the kidlets are not confined to traditional stereotypes.

The school, not surprisingly, is called "Egalia." Women run it. Their goal? To let the kids become whatever and whoever they want, regardless of the equipment with which God endowed them. And banning "him" and "her" is just one of the many ways the school ensures that its students don't think boys are boys and girls are girls.

By now I assume that most of my readers have already seen the Oscar-winning movie of 2011, The King’s Speech, the dramatic story of King George VI and his debilitating speech impediment and how it was cured by an eccentric Australian speech therapist.

But that’s only part of the story. It is also about England in the 1930s, leading up to World War II, and so it is also a great lesson in history. It is also the story of the British royal family dealing with the strained relationship between the two brothers, David the older, Prince of Wales, heir to the throne, and George the stammerer. When their father dies and David becomes King Edward VIII. But he is very unhappy because he is not permitted to marry his twice-divorced lover, the American Wallis Simpson. He abdicates the throne in order to be able to marry the woman he loves. This became one of great love affairs of the 20th century, in which a King gave up his throne for a woman. The former king and his wife become the famous Duke and Duchess of Windsor.

President Obama’s former Chief of Staff Rahm Emanuel once said, “Never let a good crisis go to waste.” Some wonder if that is what is taking place in Michigan. A new state law, Public Act 4, signed earlier this year, grants much wider powers to emergency financial managers (EFMs) who are assigned to fiscally troubled cities and school districts. Though the measure has drawn the criticism of political analysts as well as interest groups, proponents say it will prove to be beneficial to struggling cities, as drastic times call for drastic measures. While the law provides EFMs increased authority, the EFM program was not established under the new law. The Blaze explains:

The authority for the EFM program was established by Michigan’s Public Act 72 that was signed into law by Democratic Gov. Jim Blanchard in 1990. If the state determined that a serious financial problem existed in a municipality or school district, Public Act 72 granted the governor’s office authority to intervene in local government administration as a last resort means of shoring up budget deficits. But as the state’s budget problems only continued to grow, it became clear that while well-intentioned, the EFM would not have the necessary tools to be successful.
 

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