It’s 1943 and you find yourself in Germany. A Nazi officer is pointing a gun at you and demanding that you hop on a bulldozer and use it to bury hundreds of Jewish families who have been shot and are piled up in a huge pit. But among the dead are some individuals who are still living, crying out for mercy. What would you do, knowing that if you refuse to bury these people alive you will be gunned down yourself?

This is one of the thought-provoking questions that noted Christian apologist Ray Comfort asks a group of “pro-choice” individuals in the new online video 180, a movie that many in the pro-life movement argue is poised to radically change the debate about abortion.

In the movie, Comfort subtly juxtaposes the Hitler-led horror known as the Holocaust — which, by some accounts, stole the lives of more than six million Jews — with America’s own abortion holocaust, that, conservatively, has claimed the lives of over 53 million unborn babies over the past 38 years.

The responses of the “pro-choice” individuals to the bulldozer question are varied. “I don’t know,” responds one lady with emotion.

The recently released movie The Big Year — featuring a cast of well-known faces and a number of poignant and also comical scenes — focuses on a group of bird-watchers who allow their pride to interfere with everything that's important in life. With a positive pro-family message and loads of humor, it's a family friendly film for audiences of all ages.

Kenny Bostick (Owen Wilson) is very proud of his “Big Year,” wherein he spotted 732 different species of birds — a record in birding history.

Naturally, other bird-watchers are trying to break such a coveted record, and Brad Harris (Jack Black) and Stu Preissler (Steve Martin) turn it into a fierce (and humorous) competition — at times even a contact sport.

Harris — gifted with the ability to recognize the species of any bird simply by its call — nevertheless does not have the financial means to be chasing his feathered friends across the globe; therefore, he must figure out an economical way to top Bostick's record.

Facing criticism from a prominent leader of the Roman Catholic Church because of the President’s unwillingness to uphold federal laws defending traditional marriage, the Obama administration appears bent on supporting same-sex unions — while simply ignoring both law and public opinion.

 As reported for The New American on September 30, New York Archbishop Timothy Dolan took issue with President Obama’s unwillingness to uphold the 1996 “Defense of Marriage Act,” which was signed into law by President Clinton. Dolan’s September 26 talk —“The Ring Makes a Difference”— denounced Obama’s effort to "redefine" marriage through his support of “same-sex” unions, declaring Obama’s policy to be an “ominous threat to religious liberty.” As the Poughkeepsie Journal noted after Dolan’s speech:

Dolan said the defense of marriage was not simply a religious issue, but an American issue. He defined marriage as a "natural law" created by God for the purpose of procreating children.

"Anything that tampers with this natural law places the human race in peril," he said, addressing a crowd of about 800 people. …

Courageous is one of the few films to hit the big screen this year that's worth writing home about. Exploring the lives of four men that are impacted by tragedy, the movie deals with spirituality and faith, and tells a story that will likely remain with its viewers long after the final credits.

Courageous explores the paternal relationships of four unique families.

Police officer Adam Mitchell (Alex Kendrick) believes himself to be a good father because he provides for the physical needs of his wife and children, but thinks nothing of skipping out on a 5K father-son race, or declining an offer from his 9-year old daughter to dance together in a deserted parking lot. He seems to believe that because he works hard at his career, which supports his family, he has earned the right to neglect the emotional needs of his family.

Meanwhile, police officer Shane Fuller (Kevin Downes) struggles with maintaining a relationship with his son after his divorce, and finds it difficult to maintain monthly alimony. Rookie David Thompson (Ben Davies) does his best to keep the fact that he has a child hidden from the world, choosing instead to play the role of a carefree bachelor. Nathan Hayes (Ken Bevel) is another police officer who has made the conscious decision to support his family in a way his father never did, and is willing to meet that challenge each and every day.

For the so-called “old media,” it was the best of times, it was the worst of times.  Last week the Pew Research Center for The People and The Press released a survey whose results indicate that 43 percent of Americans now claim to get most of their news from Internet sources. This figure represents a record number of respondents citing the web as their primary provider of information on issues of national and international importance.
 
Television news is declining as Internet news is rising. The number of Americans polled by the Pew group that identified television as their first choice for news is at a record low. Sixty-six percent still claimed to look to TV for their news.
 
For 20 years the Pew organization has been asking Americans: “How do you get most of your news about national and international issues?”
 
According to a synopsis of the survey:

Homosexual activists have launched a petition drive aimed at forcing PayPal, an online e-commerce business, to stop handling donations made to a group of organizations that promote traditional family values, and which are battling the "gay" agenda. The group All Out is demanding that PayPal immediately suspend the online accounts of 10 mostly Christian organizations it calls “anti-LGBT extremist groups.” LGBT, an acronym for “Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender,” is one of the most recent labels aggressive homosexuals have coined to describe their “community.”

“PayPal officially states that its users ‘may not use the PayPal service for activities that … promote hate, violence, racial intolerance,’” begins the petition, “but PayPal has become a favorite payment service for anti-LGBT extremists all over the world. PayPal must act immediately to shut down their accounts and ban all sites that promote anti-LGBT hate.”

The petition points out that “not only is it against PayPal’s rules to promote ‘hate, violence, [and] racial intolerance,’ [but] hate groups also damage PayPal’s brand and credibility. We ask that PayPal join the fight against online hate and immediately shut down the accounts of anti-LGBT extremist groups using the service.”

The Obama administration has defied a decision by the government of New Hampshire to defund abortion provider Planned Parenthood, announcing that it had “awarded family planning contracts to Planned Parenthood of Northern New England despite the state Executive Council’s vote against the group,” reported the Nashua Telegraph. The state newspaper claimed the administration was forced “to act quickly because the Executive Council had left 16,000 families without services that range from birth control to exams for breast or cervical cancer.”

In refunding the abortion giant the Obama administration declared that there was “an urgent need to reinstate services with an experienced provider that is familiar with the provision of Title X family planning services and applicable laws, regulations, and administrative requirements, and has a history of successfully providing services in these areas of the state.”

As reported by Baptist Press News, the state’s Republican-controlled Executive Council “voted 3-2 in June to prevent Planned Parenthood of Northern New England’s six New Hampshire clinics from receiving $1.8 million in federal and state family planning funds.

The Virginia Board of Health has approved tough new regulations governing the operation of abortuaries in the Old Dominion. The regulations now permit the state to closely monitor these businesses to ensure that women who seek to end the lives of their unborn children do so in a safe, sterile environment.

Abortionists and their political backers, as well as the abortion industry, opposed the regulations, but could do little to stop them. Gov. Bob McDonnell, a moderate conservative, appointed nine of the health board’s 14 members.

The new rules, approved 12-1, now go to conservative Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli for review. He and the Governor will likely approve them.

SB 924, the Rules

The new authority to monitor the abortion business arose from Senate Bill 924, which mandated that state health regulations treat abortuaries in a manner similar to hospitals.

North Carolina’s legislature placed the fate of marriage in that state into the hands of the citizenry on September 13 when the state Senate voted 30-16 in favor of a state constitutional amendment defining marriage as only between a man and a woman. That vote came one day after the state House approved the amendment by a 75-42 margin, setting up next May’s ballot referendum, which will require a simple majority approval by voters in order to inscribe the marriage protection measure into the state’s constitution.

“It is time for us to let the people of this state decide what they want in their constitution as far as marriage is concerned,” Republican state Senator Phil Berger challenged fellow lawmakers during floor debate on the amendment. “It may pass, it may fail. But it is time for them to make that decision about their constitution.”

As reported by Baptist Press News: “All four states that border North Carolina passed constitutional marriage amendments in 2004 or 2006, but leaders in the then-Democratic controlled North Carolina legislature blocked an amendment from even coming to a floor vote. That changed last year when Republicans took over both chambers for the first time in more than 100 years.”

In a shocking ruling by a Canadian appeal court, a woman who strangled her son with her underwear after secretly giving birth to him will face no jail time because the judge determined that her actions were no different from an abortion.

When Katrina Effert was 19-years old, she gave birth to a baby boy, and immediately strangled the child and threw his body over the fence into the neighbor’s yard on April 13, 2005.

Two years ago, a jury found Effert guilty of second-degree murder, but the highest court in the province decided that the jury had made a mistake. The Alberta Court of Appeal overturned the conviction, and replaced it with a lesser charge of infanticide.

The Criminal Code of Canada classifies infanticide as follows:

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