The new regime of Muslim central banker Alassane Ouattara, installed in the Ivory Coast using United Nations troops backed by the Obama administration, suspended all of the country’s opposition newspapers and is reportedly leading a vicious crackdown on political opponents. Human rights activists and Western diplomats spoke out against the assaults, leading to a temporary lifting of the media suspensions this week. But trouble is still brewing.

The United States and Great Britain are leading an armada of cruisers, aircraft carriers, and mine sweepers from 25 countries for 12 days of the largest exercise of "war games" in the history of the Persian Gulf region, the Guardian of London reported over the past weekend.

The labor unrest surrounding South African mining is continuing to spread as accusations about who is responsible fly in all directions and international pressure against the ruling regime over the accelerating genocide of white farmers expands. Security officials and military forces raided miner shanty towns over the weekend to confiscate weapons from strikers, but the chaos is still spreading.

Pointing to recent attacks on American consulates and embassies — including the murder of U.S. Libyan Ambassador Christopher Stevens — Senator Rand Paul (R-Ky.) on September 13 offered an amendment to the foreign aid bill that would deny funds to Pakistan, Egypt, and Libya.

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney left some of his fellow Republicans and media allies troubled by his eagerness to condemn the Obama administration's response to Tuesday's anti-American demonstration in Egypt and the attack on our consulate in Benghazi, Libya that killed Ambassador J. Christopher Stevens and three other U.S. diplomats. Romney described an earlier statement issued by the U.S. embassy in Cairo as the administration's "first response" to the attack, characterizing the statement as "akin to an apology" for an anti-Muslim film that sparked the riots and an attempt to "sympathize" with the attackers.

The Obama administration is being heavily criticized over its response to the ongoing crisis surrounding American diplomatic missions in the Middle East and North Africa, turmoil that has seen Islamist mobs attack multiple embassies and has already claimed the life of U.S. Ambassador to Libya Christopher Stevens. Among other elements, critics slammed the president’s failure to vigorously defend free speech rights and explain it to the world. 

JBS CEO Art Thompson's weekly video news update for September 17-23, 2012. In this week's video news update JBS CEO Art Thompson discusses: Arab unrest; voter fraud in Milwaukee, Wisconsin; and reporters in collusion with revolutions and military extremists.

 Michael Hayden, a former general and CIA director, says the United States now has "moral responsibility" for the future of Libya because our actions in helping overthrow Moammar Gadhafi continue to cause bloodshed and unrest, such as the attack on the U.S. embassy and the murder of Ambassador J. Christopher Stevens.

 An Islamist mob stormed the U.S. embassy in Yemen’s capital city of Sana’a, torching a building after tearing down the American flag and setting it on fire. The latest incident, like the September 11 attacks on American diplomatic missions in Egypt and Libya, was widely reported to have been sparked by outrage over a crude YouTube video depicting the Islamic Prophet Mohammed as a barbarian pedophile.

 At least four American officials including U.S. Ambassador to Libya John Christopher Stevens are reportedly dead after outraged Islamist mobs attacked U.S. diplomatic missions in Egypt and Libya on September 11. The frenzied hordes were apparently upset about an online film made by an Israeli-American that ridicules the Islamic Prophet Mohammed as a savage pedophile. Experts, however, say it is much broader than that.

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