The messy launch of ObamaCare sets the stage for the eventual elimination of all exchanges and insurance companies in favor of a single-payer national healthcare system.

As the government is partially shut down, the Senate has rejected a House motion to negotiate House and Senate differences; no resolution is in sight.

The federal government entered into a partial shutdown at midnight October 1 as congressional leaders were unable to agree upon a “continuing resolution” appropriations bill to fund programs in the new fiscal year.

The moment of truth is now. Constitutionalists will maintain their principles. Others will shed their Tea Party costumes. Americans will shortly learn the difference.

As Democrats and Republicans squabble over federal funding and a partial shutdown of the federal government looms, many in the press are mindlessly parroting Democratic Party's talking points about the shutdown. But what's the reality?

On Friday the Senate passed a continuing resolution (CR) that restores funding for ObamaCare.

Senator Rand Paul (R-Ky.) is offering an amendment that would prohibit federal employees from taking taxpayer-funded subsidies to pay for ObamaCare health insurance.

House Republicans are attempting to take a vote this weekend on a bill to delay ObamaCare in exchange for agreeing to raise the debt ceiling.

Sen. Ted Cruz spoke for 21 hours about the need to defund ObamaCare, but will his efforts be successful?

For nearly an hour just after midnight on September 25, Senator Mike Lee (R-Utah) spoke on the "lawless act" that was the Supreme Court's Obamacare decision.

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