As resistance intensifies to the Obama administration’s mandate requiring employers to offer health insurance that includes free access to contraception, a federal judge has ruled that pharmacists in Washington State can be guided by their consciences rather than the state with regard to stocking and distributing abortifacients — the types of contraceptive drugs that can cause abortions.

Sixteen years after President Bill Clinton signed it into law, and 12 months after President Obama ordered the Department of Justice to stop defending it, a federal judge in San Francisco ruled Wednesday that the federal Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) is unconstitutional because it bars health insurance and other benefits from being extended to the same-sex partners of government employees. DOMA defines marriage as the legal union of only a man and a woman for purposes of federal business.

Thankfully, the twentieth GOP presidential debate has come and gone.  If the American voter doesn’t know these candidates by now, he never will.  Of the four remaining candidates, three are virtually indistinguishable from one another. This much has been established time and time again throughout this election season. It is true, of course, that there exist some differences between Mitt Romney, Rick Santorum, and Newt Gingrich. But such differences are negligible, both in themselves and, especially, relative to the enormity of the similarities that they share.
 
 

According to a new report by The Heritage Foundation, the White House handed out "administrative earmarks" to Democratic legislators to sway them to vote for major legislative efforts such as cap-and-trade and the healthcare overhaul.
 
 

The Alabama Supreme Court has placed a shot across the bow of Roe v. Wade's crumbling rampart, calling on states to abandon the concept of fetal “viability” introduced in that ruling and to recognize the right to life of the unborn.

Senator Marco Rubio has introduced S. 2043 to block Obama's contraception mandate.

These days, if you want to enroll your child in a public kindergarten, you have to give proof that your child has had all of his inoculations. If not, your child will not be accepted. Which, I believe, is a good reason not to put your child in a public school. But if you comply with the school’s requirements, then don’t complain when your child becomes “learning disabled,” “functionally illiterate,” or acquires Attention Deficit Disorder.

 

In a move that is fated to incite political mutiny, Sens. Tom Coburn (R-Okla.) and Richard Burr (R-N.C.) unveiled a bold Medicare reform proposal on Thursday that would expedite a transition to private health insurance, increase the eligibility age for oncoming seniors, and enact higher premiums for middle- to upper-class retirees.

 

Attorneys General from a dozen states are considering a federal lawsuit against the Obama administration’s contraception mandate requiring employers to provide insurance that includes free contraception — including sterilization and drugs that can cause abortion. Led by Nebraska’s Attorney General, Jon Bruning, the top state lawyers issued a strongly worded letter to the administration expressing their “strong opposition” to the mandate, and warning: “Should this unconstitutional mandate be promulgated, we are prepared to vigorously oppose it in court.”

 

The Heritage Foundation reports that 20 percent of Americans receive some form of subsidy from the federal government. That means nearly 70 million Americans are on the dole, receiving housing, food, medical, or other assistance from the taxpayers, and well more than half the federal budget goes to direct assistance to individuals.


 
 

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