The White House has informed Governors that they are forbidden from opting out of the Department of Homeland Security’s controversial Secure Communities (SComm) program. The plan mandates the cooperation of federal, state, and local law-enforcement agencies in the identification, arrest, and deportation of criminal aliens. U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) is the branch of DHS tasked with managing the program.

On Friday, the Department of Homeland Security informed Governors that the SComm program does not require state ratification and that it would operate in those states with or without approval of the state government. Furthermore, state executives were told that any agreements entered into by DHS with states regarding the scope of the particular state’s participation in the identification and tracking scheme were immediately null and of no legal effect.

If a country wishes to save its taxpayers some money, it should enact stiff immigration laws. That’s the conclusion of a report from the Danish Integration Ministry, according to Spiegel Online.

Denmark has imposed tough measures to stem the flow of Third World immigrants, and those stricter laws have saved the taxpayers about $10 billion during the past decade. The country now boasts the strictest controls in the European Union. Though the Eurocrat left has voiced opposition to the tighter controls, conservatives believe that Denmark is in better shape than most countries that have been overrun by immigrants, many of whom join the welfare rolls and commit crimes.

Sixteen nations, all of them sources of illegal aliens who cross Mexico’s border into the United States, have filed briefs concurring with the U.S. Justice Department’s lawsuit against Alabama to block the enforcement of the state’s newly passed immigration law. The briefs claim the law, HB 56, impedes the relations between the United States and those nations, the Montgomery Advertiser reports.

Along with the Justice Department’s attack on Alabama, another challenge to the law came from the usual coalition of open-borders advocates, including Mobile's Roman Catholic archbishop, who has used the issue to press the case that tough immigration laws are inherently racist.

A federal judge has consolidated the lawsuits.

A high-ranking Mexican drug trafficker with the powerful Sinaloa cartel made a series of explosive allegations in a federal court filing, arguing that he had an agreement with top U.S. officials allowing his criminal empire to obtain American weapons from the federal government while shipping tons of cocaine and heroin across the border. According to court documents, U.S. agents even helped the cartel elude Mexican and American investigators in exchange for information on rival drug groups.

The claims were made by Jesus Vicente “El Vicentillo” Zambada-Niebla, who was arrested by the Mexican military in 2009 and extradited to the U.S. for trial on federal drug-trafficking charges. Prosecutors accused him of serving as the “logistical coordinator” for the Sinaloa cartel. He responded earlier this year by invoking a “public authority” defense — essentially arguing that since he was working for the U.S. government under an agreement, he cannot be prosecuted.

Arizona has taken the problem of illegal immigration seriously. Like several other states, Arizona has not just focused on the illegal immigrants themselves. Those who profit by hiring illegal immigrants also face more rigorous state actions for their misconduct.  In 2007, Arizona passed LAWA or the “Legal Arizona Workers Act,” which provided for escalating legal sanctions up to the revocation of an employer’s right to do business if the employer knowingly hired illegal immigrants.

The law was not punitive against immigrants.  It did not treat legal immigrants any differently than American citizens.  State governments have, and do, restricted employment for different classes of citizens.  Sex offenders, for example, are often barred from working in schools or daycare facilities.  Drunk drivers lose their license to drive and, by that restriction, their ability to work at many jobs.

Mexican trucks may begin hauling freight throughout the United States by the end of this month or early September under a bilateral trade agreement that resolves a long-standing trade dispute, but not the controversy over driving goods across the U.S.-Mexican border.  

Under the pilot program, announced last month by the U.S. Department of Transportation, about 900 Mexican trucks will be hauling goods throughout the United States within the next three years. USA Today reported Wednesday that the pact continues to draw fire in the United States from the nation's largest transportation union, a national association of independent truckers, and some members of Congress.

"We think it's unsafe, unfair and wrong for America," Jim Hoffa, president of the Teamsters union, told the nationwide daily. "It's a danger to highway safety. ... It will cost thousands of trucking and warehouse jobs."

The Justice Department is challenging Alabama’s new immigration law, which permits police officers to detain people during traffic stops whom they suspect may be illegal immigrants. The DOJ filed a lawsuit against the Alabama law, contending it conflicts with the federal government’s jurisdiction.

The Justice Department filed the lawsuit in an Alabama federal court, asserting that Alabama’s law allows the Alabama police to have entirely too much power, and that it would increase the incarceration of illegal immigrants by creating new immigration crimes.

 

As Democrat-turned-Republican Texas Governor Rick Perry continues to tease Americans with “will he or won’t he?” run for President, many Lone Star State voters are taking a closer look at his record — particularly on the issue of immigration.

Of the four border states (Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, and California), Texas presides over more than half of the nation’s international border with Mexico: 1,254 miles of the Rio Grande River. Though the other three states have their fair share of serious immigration problems, Texas — by its sheer size — has the lion's share.

For the record, the Governor’s website gives his position on border security: “There can be no homeland security without border security, and there can be no higher priority than protecting our citizens.”

According to Borderland Beat (BB) of July 21, a “puzzling web of events” has resulted in the death of yet another American in the Mexican city of Ciudad Juarez, across the international border from El Paso, Texas. BB reported that three suspects were arrested Wednesday in connection with a man’s kidnapping on July 5, and a fourth suspect is sought. The American was found murdered the day after the kidnapping.

Mexican officials wouldn’t release the victim’s name, but University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) officials confirmed that Jorge Luis Dieppa, 57, a court interpreter and part-time lecturer at UTEP, was killed in Juarez. Dieppa was also a member of the El Paso Interpreters and Translators Association and had worked as an interpreter for the Texas Workforce Commission. Federal officials would not disclose further information. Fox News reported that a UTEP spokeswoman said that Dieppa, a Spanish interpreter since 2004, worked in the languages and linguistics department at the university.

On July 12 Rep. Lamar Smith (R-Texas) introduced H.R. 2497, known as the Hinder the Administration’s Legalization Temptation (HALT) Act in order to counter the Obama administration’s June 17 “prosecutorial discretion” policy of granting amnesty to illegal immigrants on a case-by-case basis.

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