The National Security Agency (NSA) is using its controversial domestic surveillance program to gather millions of images from text messages and social media (e.g, Facebook) and then running the images against its facial recognition programs to identify those pictured.

JBS CEO Art Thompson's weekly news video update for June 2 - 8, 2014.

"We were a clear demonstration that official channels didn't work," said William Binney, one of a trio of National Security Agency employees who tired to "blow the whistle" on the NSA's domestic surveillance activities more than a decade before Edward Snowden delivered classified documents from the agency's files to The Guardian.

Calling Edward Snowden a "traitor" and a "coward," Secretary of State John Kerry said Wednesday the man who leaked classified documents revealing the National Security Agency's data collection of Americans' phone calls and e-mails should "man up" and return from Russia to face charges of espionage and theft of government documents.

Glenn Greenwald has indicated that he may soon release the names of all U.S. citizens targeted by the NSA.

Greenwald makes his connection with Edward Snowden sound like a John Grisham thriller, with this difference: The NSA's surveillance state is no fantasy.

The U.S. House of Representatives passed a watered down USA Freedom Act on May 22, forcing most of its original sponsors to vote against the legislation.

A new feature of the Facebook mobile app will allow it to record everything a user hears.

On May 19 the California state Senate voted 29-1 to approve SB 828, the California Fourth Amendment Protection Act, which would prohibit the state from helping any federal agency that attempts the “illegal and unconstitutional collection of electronic data.”

The Missouri legislature has sent to voters a proposed amendment preventing unwarranted surveillance of electronic and digital communication.

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