Senator Rand Paul’s (R-Ky.) constitutional challenge to the National Security Agency’s (NSA's) warrantless collection of phone data took another giant step forward Monday, as the freshman lawmaker, along with FreedomWorks, filed a motion opposing the Obama administration’s attempt to scuttle the suit.

Representative Justin Amash (R-Mich.) has introduced two amendments to the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 2015 that would ban bulk NSA surveillance of Americans.

A plot by the Obama administration to impose Internet IDs on Americans is now officially being rolled out, with pilot programs for the controversial online “driver’s license” scheme already beginning in both Michigan and Pennsylvania.

The European “Court of Justice,” the European Union’s highest judicial body, ruled this week that individuals have a “right to be forgotten” and that search engines such as Google must comply with requests to remove links. Analysts were divided on the ruling, with some noting that it raises major concerns about the right to free speech and freedom of information, while others celebrated the purported extension of the right to privacy. The dubious court’s ruling also advances the long-time globalist goal of transnational regulation of the Internet.

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Rep. Bob Goodlatte (R-Va.) announced May 5 that on May 7 the committee will mark up the USA Freedom Act (H.R. 3361).

An abortion rights group claims that it has persuaded Google to drop some online ads for pro-life services.

Under the guise of advancing “global governance” over the Internet by so-called stakeholders — including, of course, governments, autocrats, and international organizations such as the United Nations — the radical Brazilian government brought together key players for the “NETmundial” summit last week.

JBS CEO Art Thompson's weekly news video update for April 28 - May 4, 2014.

A recently released memo from then-President Bill Clinton’s White House revealed that the administration was frantic about the rise of the free Internet.

You’re free in Sweden to be critical of immigration, those in power, or people identifying as “LBGT” — at least within the confines of your mind.

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