In the little town of Bluffdale, Utah, between the Wasatch Range and the Oquirrh Mountains, the National Security Agency (NSA) is building what will be the nation's largest spy center, reports Wired, a print magazine and online publication reporting on technological developments and their effects, including electronic privacy. Dubbed the Utah Data Center, the project is already employing thousands of hardhat workers in its construction and will soon have some 10,000 construction workers building a data center that will be more than five times the size of the nation's capitol, Wired reports.

 

March 16 is the birthday of James Madison, known as the "Father of the Constitution." Several years ago, the American Society of News Editors initiated a program called Sunshine Week, intended to coincide with the birthday of this illustrious Founding Father. The purpose of Sunshine Week was "to educate the public about the importance of open government and the dangers of excessive and unnecessary secrecy."

 

Frequently, the most important news items are not those that make the front page, but rather those details that are, when reported at all, relegated to the back pages. The November 22,  2011 Presidential Debate may be an example of this. The final question asked of the Republican presidential candidates that evening was posed by Mark Teese, a visiting fellow at the American Enterprise Institute. Unfortunately, there has been very little follow-up on this topic at the subsequent Presidential Debates.

 

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is not afraid of congressional oversight into its domestic spying program.  Last week, DHS Chief Privacy Officer Mary Ellen Callahan and Director of Operations Coordination and Planning Richard Chavez testified before the House Subcommittee on Counterintelligence and Intelligence, and their testimony was alarming to those concerned about the near constant assault by the federal government on the Constitution and the Fourth Amendment in particular.
 
 

Within minutes of posting his last tweet at 11:25 p.m. PST on Wednesday night, in which he apologized for calling one of his followers a “putz,” Andrew Breitbart was dead of an apparent heart attack at the age of 43. Most of Breitbart’s followers adored his energy, his brashness and his courage.

A UN takeover of the Internet could be set in motion at a December meeting in Dubai. At first there was barely a whisper that an international effort had been undertaken to gain more control of the Internet. But now, thanks to the free exchange of information over the Internet, that whisper has become a much louder voice, spurring many to push back against a global attempt to take over and regulate various aspects of Internet operations, such as assignment of domain names and privacy controls.

Congress should reject the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA) signed by President Obama on October 1, 2011.

The anti-secrecy group WikiLeaks announced on Monday it would be working with over two dozen media organizations around the world to publish millions of e-mails from the Austin, Texas-based private intelligence-gathering firm Stratfor. And scandal is already brewing.
 
 

U.S. Army PFC Bradley Manning was formally charged on Thursday under the Espionage Act (18 USC Chapter 37) with 22 crimes, including aiding the enemy.  In what is described as “the biggest leak of classified information in U.S. history,” Manning is accused of passing over 700,000 documents and video clips to WikiLeaks, the widely known website devoted to exposing government corruption throughout the world.

 

A pair of pro-life activists are protesting Facebook’s decision to remove a graphic they had posted on their site that included an image of a pre-born baby aborted at eight weeks. What makes the censorship even more troubling is the fact that Facebook had earlier issued an apology to a pro-abortion site for taking down a post that offered explicit instructions for performing a do-it-yourself chemical abortion with the drug Misoprostol, used by doctors to induce labor in pregnant women. The Facebook officials backed up their apology by reposting the abortion instructions.

 

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