British Prime Minister David Cameron is reportedly considering the drastic step of “pre-crime” blocking of social media sites if the violent riots in his country continue. He contends that such a move would permit authorities more time to “catch up” with arrests of suspects shown rioting on surveillance cameras. The communication platforms under particular scrutiny are Twitter, Facebook, and Blackberry Instant Messenger.

In an address to the British House of Commons on Thursday, Cameron explained:

Free flow of information can be used for good. But it can also be used for ill. So we are working with the Police, the intelligence services and industry to look at whether it would be right to stop people communicating via these websites and services when we know they are plotting violence, disorder and criminality.

Similar measures were taken by then-President Hosni Mubarak during the Egyptian revolution earlier this year. The Guardian reported on the impact of social networking during the conflict:

After attending the Bilderberg conference in Switzerland in June, Facebook’s marketing director, Randi Zuckerberg, announced that she had solved the cyberbullying issue: Prohibit anonymous Internet activity.

In addition to being the director of marketing for the social media icon, Zuckerberg is the sister of Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg. The siblings attended the Bilderberg conference where Mark Zuckerberg delivered a key address.
Many of the Internet’s elites were present for the annual secret confab held this year in St. Moritz, Switzerland. According to an exposé by The New American’s own Alex Newman, many such luminaries were on hand at the conference:

Google announced on its blog on June 24th that the Federal Trade Commission had launched “a review of our business. We respect the FTC’s process and will be working with them over the coming months to answer questions about Google and our services. ” But Google doesn’t know what the FTC is looking for:

It’s still unclear exactly what the FTC’s concerns are, but we’re clear about where we stand. Since the beginning, we have been guided by the idea that, if we focus on the user, all else will follow.

No matter what you’re looking for — buying a movie ticket, finding the best burger nearby, or watching a royal wedding — we want to get you the information you want as quickly as possible…

The U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC) took a big step toward government regulation of the Internet on December 21, 2010 with a bureaucratic vote in favor of so-called “net neutrality” rules, but critics are already plotting a counter-attack.

Under the guise of security, the Obama administration is creating an Internet ID for all Americans, with the program for the National Strategy for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace being announced back on January 2011 by Commerce Secretary Gary Locke.

On March 15 the House Energy and Commerce Committee passed H.J. Res. 37, a resolution of disapproval that would reverse the Federal Communications Commission’s “net neutrality” regulations put forward last December but set to take effect in mid-2011.

JBS CEO Art Thompson's topic this week: Big Brother Internet and Taxes Equal Jobs? In the name of saving journalism, the government wants a stimulus program that will tax and control journalism and the Internet. Also, printing money equals the death of retirement funds.

One of the hallmarks of a free society is a free exchange of ideas and information. The Internet is a great tool that provides for this. The JBS believes that the First Amendment guarantees Internet users the freedom to freely speak their mind and the Fourth Amendment protects them in doing so anonymously. New technology does not change timeless principles.

cybersecurity

“To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 and other laws to enhance the security and resiliency of the cyber and communications infrastructure of the United States.” These are the words used to describe the latest cybersecurity bill, S. 3480  "Protecting Cyberspace as a National Asset Act of 2010," introduced on June 10 and cosponsored by Senators Susan Collins (R-Maine), Joe Lieberman (I-Conn.) and Tom Carper (D-Del.).

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