The U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC) took a big step toward government regulation of the Internet on December 21, 2010 with a bureaucratic vote in favor of so-called “net neutrality” rules, but critics are already plotting a counter-attack.

Under the guise of security, the Obama administration is creating an Internet ID for all Americans, with the program for the National Strategy for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace being announced back on January 2011 by Commerce Secretary Gary Locke.

On March 15 the House Energy and Commerce Committee passed H.J. Res. 37, a resolution of disapproval that would reverse the Federal Communications Commission’s “net neutrality” regulations put forward last December but set to take effect in mid-2011.

JBS CEO Art Thompson's topic this week: Big Brother Internet and Taxes Equal Jobs? In the name of saving journalism, the government wants a stimulus program that will tax and control journalism and the Internet. Also, printing money equals the death of retirement funds.

One of the hallmarks of a free society is a free exchange of ideas and information. The Internet is a great tool that provides for this. The JBS believes that the First Amendment guarantees Internet users the freedom to freely speak their mind and the Fourth Amendment protects them in doing so anonymously. New technology does not change timeless principles.

cybersecurity

“To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 and other laws to enhance the security and resiliency of the cyber and communications infrastructure of the United States.” These are the words used to describe the latest cybersecurity bill, S. 3480  "Protecting Cyberspace as a National Asset Act of 2010," introduced on June 10 and cosponsored by Senators Susan Collins (R-Maine), Joe Lieberman (I-Conn.) and Tom Carper (D-Del.).

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