A plot by the Obama administration to impose Internet IDs on Americans is now officially being rolled out, with pilot programs for the controversial online “driver’s license” scheme already beginning in both Michigan and Pennsylvania.

The European “Court of Justice,” the European Union’s highest judicial body, ruled this week that individuals have a “right to be forgotten” and that search engines such as Google must comply with requests to remove links. Analysts were divided on the ruling, with some noting that it raises major concerns about the right to free speech and freedom of information, while others celebrated the purported extension of the right to privacy. The dubious court’s ruling also advances the long-time globalist goal of transnational regulation of the Internet.

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Rep. Bob Goodlatte (R-Va.) announced May 5 that on May 7 the committee will mark up the USA Freedom Act (H.R. 3361).

An abortion rights group claims that it has persuaded Google to drop some online ads for pro-life services.

Under the guise of advancing “global governance” over the Internet by so-called stakeholders — including, of course, governments, autocrats, and international organizations such as the United Nations — the radical Brazilian government brought together key players for the “NETmundial” summit last week.

JBS CEO Art Thompson's weekly news video update for April 28 - May 4, 2014.

A recently released memo from then-President Bill Clinton’s White House revealed that the administration was frantic about the rise of the free Internet.

You’re free in Sweden to be critical of immigration, those in power, or people identifying as “LBGT” — at least within the confines of your mind.

As expected, most of the criticism about the Pulitzer Prize nomination for revealing the NSA's warrantless spying on Americans is coming from those with a vested interest in the surveillance state.

Barack Obama's praise for the "Swedish model" leads some to believe that he would like the United States to emulate it. But given that even just questioning immigration can bring persecution in Sweden, the Swedish "perfect society" may not be so perfect after all.

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