President Obama has some nerve. He opened his speech on NSA spying by likening his surveillance regime to Paul Revere and the Sons of Liberty.

The architects of the sprawling federal surveillance apparatus probably didn’t count on one thing that could bring their unconstitutional construction to an abrupt end: nullification.

The inconsistencies of Snowden's detractors are revealed.

If he were to borrow a slogan his old rival and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton helped popularize, President Obama in his January 17 speech might have said, "It takes a village" to run a surveillance state.

Obama's speech January 17 echoed the longtime executive branch viewpoint that Americans should have no expectation of privacy in electronic transactions.

Chelsea (formerly Bradley) Manning, the U.S. Army private whose divulgence of classified materials to WikiLeaks in 2010 resulted in his 35-year prison sentence, has been named the 2014 recipient of the Sam Adams Award for Intelligence in Integrity in Intelligence by an organization of former U.S. national security officials.

The NSA is collecting millions of text messages from innocent people and is using radio waves to control computers not connected to a network.

President Obama is "listening and discussing" with lawmakers and tech industry leaders to consider reforms to the National Security Agency’s surveillance programs.

Senator Rand Paul (R-Ky.) is closer to filing a class-action lawsuit against the National Security Agency (NSA) for violating the constitutionally protected rights of Americans.

According to one of his attorneys, NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden will increase his public profile in 2014.

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