Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin announced April 20 that it was suspending the distribution of the abortion pill RU-486, citing a new state law that has tightened the restrictions on what has come to be known as “non-surgical” or “web cam” abortions — so named because abortionists can approve the procedure without personally examining a pregnant mother.

 Whatever the ultimate outcome of the case against George Zimmerman for his shooting of Trayvon Martin, what has happened already is enough to turn the stomach of anyone who believes in either truth or justice.

 Charles Colson, President Nixon’s notorious “hatchet man,” who spent time in prison in the wake of the Watergate scandal before founding an international ministry and becoming an esteemed Christian leader, has died at age 80. Colson became ill March 30 while leading a meeting of Christian leaders at the Colson Center for Christian Worldview in Lansdowne, Virginia. The following morning he had surgery to remove a pool of clotted blood from the surface of his brain, and while doctors were initially optimistic about his recovery, his condition became grave and he died April 21 surrounded by his family.

The aversion that normal people feel toward homosexuality may actually stem from their own repressed same-sex feelings, argues a group of U.S. and British researchers. UPI News is reporting that the researchers from the University of Rochester (New York), the University of California-Santa Barbara, and the University of Essex in England conducted four separate experiments in the United States and Germany, each with an average of 160 college students, to come up with their controversial “findings.”

Many parents and churches have long advocated that unwed couples avoid living together before marriage. Now even secular research has shown that it can have severe drawbacks. The New York Times chimed in on the subject April 14 with an opinion piece entitled, “The Downside of Cohabiting Before Marriage.”

On April 20, 1999, two all-American boys, Eric Harris, 18, and Dylan Klebold, 17, born and bred in the greatest, freest, most prosperous nation on earth, perpetrated the greatest massacre in an American high school. They had intended to kill a thousand students by placing two bombs in the school cafeteria timed to go off during the height of the lunch period. They planned to sit in their cars in the parking lot, watch the building explode, and intended to kill any students who tried to flee from the inferno. But their plans went awry. The two bombs, hidden in two duffle bags, never went off, but the two teenage monsters managed to kill 12 students and a teacher.

 
 

 As it has over the past 15 years, the aggressively pro-homosexual Gay, Lesbian, and Straight Education Network (GLSEN) rolled out its self-serving Day of Silence, supposedly meant to protest the oppression and “bullying” GLSEN insists “gay” young people face. By remaining silent the entire day, explained GLSEN’s director Eliza Byard, students in high schools across the nation are “calling attention to the silencing effects of anti-LGBT [lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender] bullying, discrimination, and harassment present in too many schools across the country.”

A new law in Arizona will allow public schools to teach the Bible as an elective course. On April 17 Republican Governor Jan Brewer signed H.B. 2563 into law, paving the way for the course that will explore the Bible’s profound influence on America’s history and culture.

A California group is attempting to overturn a law requiring state school social studies curriculums to include positive portrayals of homosexuals. Signed into law last year by Governor Jerry Brown, the Fair, Accurate, Inclusive and Respectful (FAIR) Education Act (S.B. 48) requires that “lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender Americans are included and recognized for their important historical contributions to the economic, political, and social development of California, and … that discriminatory bias and negative stereotypes based on sexual orientation are prohibited in school activities and instruction, and instructional materials,” read a synopsis of the legislation by its chief sponsor, State Senator Mark Leno.

 An atheist group has targeted a memorial erected by U.S. Marines in honor of comrades killed in action in Iraq and Afghanistan. The memorial, consisting of two 13-foot crosses, was placed by seven Marines in a remote part of California’s Camp Pendleton in 2003 to honor their fallen comrades. Three of those seven soldiers were later also killed in action, and after a wildfire destroyed their original memorial, other Marines, along with widows of some of the late soldiers, erected new crosses to replace those that were destroyed.

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