Allegations of fraud surrounding an Obama campaign donor have ignited further controversy for the President’s reelection effort, as another prominent supporter has purportedly engaged in illegal activity. Abake Assongba and her husband, Anthony J.W. DeRosa, doled out more than $50,000 to Obama’s reelection campaign this year, government records show. Assongba is also facing a lawsuit in Florida, where she allegedly stole $657,000 to help finance a multimillion-dollar home in the state.

Six black men assaulted a white man outside a restaurant in Seneca, S.C. on March 17 after insulting him with a racial remark. Such was the severity of the beating and obvious racial motive that local police have referred the case to federal officials. However, contrary to their usual reaction in such matters, the national media have yet to jump on the case, and civil rights leaders have said nothing about it.

A T-shirt company in Lexington, Kentucky, is facing the wrath of a local homosexual activist contingent after the business politely passed on producing T-shirts for the city’s “gay pride” festival. On March 26, Lexington’s Gay and Lesbian Services Organization (GLSO) filed a discrimination complaint against the family-owned company, Hands On Originals, alleging that the firm had bid on producing the shirts, but when it was selected its owners changed their minds, explaining that their Christian values made them unable to fill the order for the “gay”-themed apparel.

 

The battle is heating up in Anchorage, Alaska, over a voter initiative that would add “sexual orientation” and “transgender identity” to anti-discrimination language in the city’s municipal code. Homosexual activists insist that Prop 5, which the city’s nearly 300,000 residents will vote on April 3, is a common sense measure that “simply provides to gay and transgender Alaskans the same legal protections that we already provide to other persons in Anchorage in employment, financial practices, housing, and restaurants, department stores, and other businesses,” according to OneAnchorage.com, a website promoting passage of the measure.

 

There is much talk these days about something called “Judaeo-Christian values.” This is the name that is invariably assigned to the morality to which America is supposed to have traditionally subscribed. America, we are told, is a “Judaeo-Christian” nation, a nation “founded” upon “Judaeo-Christian principles” or “ideals.”

 

A bill proposed by a Missouri state legislator would criminalize distracting actions or words that disturb worship services. The measure specifically targets protestors congregating outside churches, cathedrals, synangogues, and other places of worship who disrupt the services within with profanity, yelling, or other disruptive behavior.

The Freedom From Religion Foundation (FFRF) has found its latest target. The national atheist club has filed a federal lawsuit against a Pennsylvania legislator for a resolution, passed earlier this year in the state House of Representatives, that declares 2012 as the “Year of the Bible” in the state. The suit, which argues that the proclamation violates the First Amendment’s Establishment Clause, names the author of the resolution, State Representative Rick Saccone, as a defendant, along with the state House’s Parliamentarian, Clancy Myer, and the Chief Clerk of the House, Anthony Frank Barbush.
 

 

Every week, I think it can't get any crazier — and then it does. The other night I saw two grown men on TV getting thrown out of Rick Santorum's rally at the Christian Liberty Academy in Arlington Heights, Ill., after they stood up and kissed.

 

Individual freedom is derived from the concept of religious freedom, which is derived from the Biblical teaching that salvation is an individual and personal matter and can only be achieved through a direct and personal relationship with God. Because the Puritan colonists came to the North American wilderness in order to exercise religious freedom, they understood that individual freedom and responsibility were at the heart of Christian practice, since they believed that salvation, forgiveness of sin, and life after death could only be had through belief in Jesus Christ as Savior. And why was salvation needed?

According to Fox News, the newly-released pro-life movie October Baby “earned the second-highest-per-screen average” last weekend — behind The Hunger Games — grossing $1.7 million, for 8th place overall. Considering the competition, and that it opened in only 390 theaters, this is a remarkable feat.
 
 

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