Reflecting an ongoing controversy in Washington, D.C., New Hampshire's House of Representatives Wednesday approved a bill to exempt employers with religious or moral objections from provisions of a state law requiring health insurance plans to provide coverage for contraception. The bill passed in the heavily Republican House by a vote of 196-150 after a spirited debate, with arguments for religious liberty met with vigorous objections to limits on women's access to reproductive health services.

 

Sometimes secularism sounds legitimate.  One of the more thoughtful arguments used by proponents of a secular state, or of a state that mandates the removal of all religious and moral speech and symbols from public life, is Frenchman Frederic Bastiat's 1840 classic treatise, The Law.
 
 

The federal Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) has decided against a group of PepsiCo shareholders in their efforts to stop the company from contracting with a firm that uses cells from aborted babies in producing artificial flavor enhancers.

With all the self-importance characteristic of the professional sports culture, a group of players and coaches with National Hockey League has unveiled a special television ad highlighting that the league’s stars would be happy to share the ice with talented homosexual hockey players.

 

The scandal known as “Fakegate,” perpetrated by prominent global warming activist/scientist Peter Gleick, continues to reverberate. Gleick has taken a leave of absence from his position as president of the Pacific Institute for Studies in Development, Environment, and Security, and the Institute’s board has announced that it is conducting an investigation of the Fakegate affair. While some of Gleick’s climate activist confreres have decried his unethical actions and have bemoaned the fact that it is already further undermining public confidence in the claims of global warming alarmists, others are cheering and applauding Gleick’s actions as justified and heroic.

There are undoubtedly many people who are alive today because of James Q. Wilson, who died last week. He was not a doctor or medical scientist, nor was he a fireman or coast guardsman who rescued people from immediate dangers.

 

The President of the United States has the authority to order the targeted killing of Americans living abroad whom he suspects of posing an extraordinary threat to the security of the homeland. This was the opinion delivered by Attorney General Eric Holder in a speech Monday at Northwestern Law School in Chicago.

 

Christian organizations continue to be assaulted on college campuses across the nation. At the University of North Carolina-Greensboro, a Christian club is suing the school after it ruled that the group isn’t religious and so must allow students of other faiths — or no faith — to join and even be in leadership if it wants to receive university recognition.
 
 

Florida Governor Rick Scott is expected to sign a bill allowing students and others to offer “inspirational messages” at public-school events. State law already allows students to engage in two minutes of silent prayer or meditation at the beginning of the school day, but S.B. 98, passed March 1 by the state legislature, would broaden the religious landscape at schools, allowing students to make short inspirational speeches or offer prayers at non-compulsory school events.

A statistical study of mosques in the United States shows that the number of Islamic houses of worship has increased 74 percent since 2000. The study also showed that mosque leaders believe the United States is generally friendly to Islam, that attendance at weekly prayer has increased during that time, and that the faithful attending mosques has increased 30 percent.

 

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