Students at Boston’s Northeastern University have succeeded in blocking fast-food chain Chick-fil-A from opening a franchise on the school’s campus, following complaints that the company financially supports organizations that have an “anti-gay” bias.

 

Leaders throughout Latin America are increasingly hinting that they may defect from the United Nations-inspired and U.S. government-led “War on Drugs.” But the Obama administration, despite adding trillions in new debt in recent years, forcefully vowed to continue pursuing the controversial war while pledging more American taxpayer funds to foreign governments for the battle.

 

Remember in the classic movie Casablanca how Captain Louis Renault pretended to be amazed when he was informed that gambling took place at Rick’s Café Américain? With a wink and a smirk, Captain Renault said he was “shocked, shocked” at the revelation.
 

A North Carolina county has thumbed its nose at the state’s ACLU franchise, which has been warning county officials all over the state to stop opening government meetings with prayer. As reported by the Associated Press, a “Rowan County commissioner opened the board’s [March 5] meeting with a Christian prayer, despite a warning from the state chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union that it would violate the law and potentially trigger a lawsuit. As has long been the elected board’s practice, Commissioner Jon Barber opened the public meeting with an invocation asking for a blessing in the name of Jesus.”
 

A Maryland prosecutor has dropped murder charges against two abortionists accused of killing viable pre-born babies, explaining that he had no way to prove whether the aborted babies were killed in Maryland or in New Jersey, as the defendants’ attorneys claim. State’s Attorney Edward Rollins dropped the charges against abortionist Steven C. Brigham and his assistant, Nicola I. Riley, who had both been indicted under Maryland’s fetal homicide law for the murders of pre-born babies who were considered viable outside the womb.

 

A nationally renowned faith-based legal advocacy organization is suing the Seaside Public Library in Oregon for denying the group the use of a meeting room to hold a biblical education seminar. The Virginia-based group Liberty Counsel (LC), which holds Christian worldview seminars around the nation, had contacted the library in 2010 about scheduling a meeting room for one of its seminars, but library officials flatly rejected the request, citing a policy prohibiting “religious services or proselytizing” on library property.

Reflecting an ongoing controversy in Washington, D.C., New Hampshire's House of Representatives Wednesday approved a bill to exempt employers with religious or moral objections from provisions of a state law requiring health insurance plans to provide coverage for contraception. The bill passed in the heavily Republican House by a vote of 196-150 after a spirited debate, with arguments for religious liberty met with vigorous objections to limits on women's access to reproductive health services.

 

Sometimes secularism sounds legitimate.  One of the more thoughtful arguments used by proponents of a secular state, or of a state that mandates the removal of all religious and moral speech and symbols from public life, is Frenchman Frederic Bastiat's 1840 classic treatise, The Law.
 
 

The federal Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) has decided against a group of PepsiCo shareholders in their efforts to stop the company from contracting with a firm that uses cells from aborted babies in producing artificial flavor enhancers.

With all the self-importance characteristic of the professional sports culture, a group of players and coaches with National Hockey League has unveiled a special television ad highlighting that the league’s stars would be happy to share the ice with talented homosexual hockey players.

 

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