The Girl Scout cookie drive is in full swing and, as in the past, the 100-year-old organization expects to profit handsomely from truckloads of thin mints, caramel delights, shortbread, and other favorites sold by a nationwide army of green-clad girls to family, friends, neighbors, teachers, and complete strangers. But a few pro-life and pro-family groups are recommending a boycott of the cookies this year because of the Girl Scout (GSUSA) organization’s partnership with Planned Parenthood, its practice of allowing sexually confused boys to join its ranks, and its reported promotion of pre-marital sex among the girls it mentors.

 

Three days after announcing that it would no longer fund Planned Parenthood, the Komen cancer charity has reversed its decision, apologizing profusely for abandoning the abortion giant. “We want to apologize to the American public for recent decisions that cast doubt upon our commitment to our mission of saving women’s lives,” Komen CEO Nancy Brinker said in a statement. “The events of this week have been deeply unsettling for our supporters, partners and friends, and all of us at Susan G. Komen. We have been distressed at the presumption that the changes made to our funding criteria were done for political reasons or to specifically penalize Planned Parenthood. They were not.”

In fact, in the original announcement Komen spokeswoman Leslie Aun had emphasized that dropping its funding to Planned Parenthood was in no way an indication of Komen’s unhappiness with the abortion group’s agenda. “We want to maintain a positive relationship with them,” she had told the Associated Press. “We’re not making any judgment.”
 
Instead, AP reported, Aun said that the funding cuts resulted from “the charity’s newly adopted criteria barring grants to organizations which are under investigation by local, state, or federal authorities. According to Komen, this applies to Planned Parenthood because it’s the focus of an inquiry launched by Rep. Cliff Stearns (R-Fla.) seeking to determine whether public money was improperly spent on abortions.”
 

Pressure from a military veterans group unhappy with his stance on Islam and the 2001 terrorist attacks on the United States has prompted retired Army Lieutenant General William G. "Jerry" Boykin to cancel his appearance as a speaker at West Point’s upcoming prayer breakfast February 8.

 

As tension mounts over the Obama administration’s ill-advised mandate requiring religious employers to include free contraception in their insurance coverage, one lawmaker is pushing back against the White House with a legislative countermove.
 
 

A U.S.-based missions support organization has mounted a petition drive aimed at pressuring a group of respected Bible translators to change how they present the relationship between God and Jesus in Arabic and Turkish Scripture translations geared for Muslim readers. According to the group Biblical Missiology, Wycliffe Bible translators, the Summer Institute of Linguistics (SIL), and a group called Frontiers have produced scriptural translations that replace “Father,” “Son,” and “Son of God,” with other words because such terms may be offensive to Muslim readers.

 

Following months of high-profile pressure by pro-life groups concerned over its ties to the abortion industry, Susan G. Komen for the Cure, one of the nation’s largest breast cancer charities, announced that it was halting its long-time funding of Planned Parenthood, the nation’s leading abortion provider. As reported by the New York Times, the long-anticipated move will cut funding to 19 of Planned Parenthood’s 83 franchises, which have received money from Komen since 2005.

 

A battle appears to be brewing between the Obama administration and the Catholic Church over the President’s insistence that religious employers provide free contraception coverage in their insurance plans. As reported January 23 in The New American, the White House announced “that under its 2010 ObamaCare medical legislation employers will be compelled to cover birth control for women free of charge, including controversial contraceptive drugs which can induce abortion early in a woman’s pregnancy. The administration rejected an appeal from religious organizations, led by the Catholic Church, for an exemption on insurance provided to employees of religious institutions such as hospitals, colleges, and charities.”

 

As Washington's legislature works diligently to force homosexual marriage on its constituents, one of the more high-profile corporate entities in the Evergreen State has volunteered to help. In a January 24 statement, Starbucks vice president Kalen Holmes announced that the coffee retailing giant was proudly joining “other leading Northwest employers in support of Washington State legislation recognizing marriage equality for same-sex couples.” Holmes emphasized that the measure, which would legalize homosexual partnerships as equal with traditional marriage, “is aligned with Starbucks business practices” and is “core to who we are and what we value as a company.”

 

Language barriers are obviously an impediment to communication. If one man speaks Chinese and another Swedish, it may be hard for them to settle even simple matters, let alone the deep issues of the day. Yet there can be language barriers even within a language, such as when people use ill-defined terminology. In fact, some debates rage on endlessly partially because people who have the same tongue are, sometimes unknowingly, speaking a different language.

 

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the 6th District has ruled that Eastern Michigan University (EMU) was out of line in expelling a graduate counseling student because of her unwillingness to validate homosexuality in her treatment of individuals struggling with same-sex attraction.

 

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