On Thursday morning, the House Armed Services Committee passed the 2013 version of the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA); the provision providing for the indefinite detention of Americans remains in the bill.

In a landmark step with global implications, the Federal Reserve — despite national security concerns — approved the first communist Chinese takeover of a U.S. bank: New York's Bank of East Asia.

 

As a candidate, Barack Obama promised to protect government whistleblowers from prosecution, but as President his administration has zealously pursued legal prosecution of these brave men and women.

 

 

 

The trial of the five men accused of participating in the planning of the attacks of September 11, 2001 began before a military tribunal at Guantanamo Bay on May 5.

Performance measures for a new U.S. Border Patrol strategy have not effectively been established, a federal auditor said Tuesday.

 

In a letter published in Foreign Affairs, the official journal of the Council on Foreign Relations, Senator Carl Levin claims that the NDAA only reaffirms existing law and that America is safer since its enactment.

On Wednesday, Russia commemorated the 67th anniversary of the Soviet Union’s victory over Nazi Germany, with a massive military parade in Moscow. The hour long ceremony was akin to the old May Day and Victory Day rallies held by the Soviet Union during the Cold War.

The U.S. government is developing implantable sensor microchips for use in American troops, supposedly to monitor their health on the battlefield, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) announced earlier this year seeking proposals. But critics of the scheme are speaking out, warning that the new technology could just be a prelude to expanding the use of related devices among the general population — with dangerous implications for freedom and privacy.

It would be funny if we weren't paying for it. Now they want us to buy chaperones for our live-wire Secret Service guys. Per year, we already spend $1.7 billion on the Secret Service, double what we spent annually before Mohamed Atta and his crew of inflamed sycophants sought to win perpetual ecstasy with some 72 heavenly hotties per martyr by turning jetliners and themselves into missiles.

The partisan squabbling over the killing of Osama bin Laden is a typical election-year distraction, effectively squelching discussion of more important matters one year after the execution of the al-Qaeda chief executive. While the commentators are engaged in trivialities, big foreign-policy questions are ignored.

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