An overwhelming majority in the House of Representatives voted to reject the Smith-Amash Amendment that would have repealed the provision of the NDAA that authorized the indefinite detention of Americans.

President Barack Obama must surely rue the day he appointed Katherine Forrest to the federal bench. On Wednesday, U.S. District Judge Katherine Forrest issued a preliminary injunction against Section 1021 of the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA), the section that gives the President “the absolute power to arrest and detain citizens of the United States [and of other countries] without their being informed of any criminal charges, without a trial on the merits of those charges, and without a scintilla of the due process safeguards protected by the Constitution of the United States,” in the words of The New American’s Joe Wolverton, II. Wolverton should know: He was a member of the legal team representing the plaintiffs.

President Obama is under fire after passing a so-called “Executive Order” threatening anyone, including American citizens, who interferes even “indirectly” with the transition to power of the new U.S. government-backed dictator of Yemen. Analysts expressed concern that the measure could be an attack on the First Amendment protection of free speech rights, suggesting that journalists and activists who oppose the Yemeni regime might find themselves targeted by the administration’s newly super-charged terror war. 

Judge Katherine Forrest of the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York issued a preliminary injunction on Wednesday preventing the Obama administration from exercising the indefinite detention authority ostensibly granted the President by Section 1021 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 2011.

Senator Kerry is planning to hold a vote on ratifying the UN Law of the Sea Treaty (LOST).

 Despite Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta's assurances to the contrary, U.S. troops will be sent back to Yemen to help the Yemeni government track and kill militants associated with al-Qaeda in the Arab Peninsula (AQAP).

“If you want a UN on steroids, you want the Law of the Sea Treaty,” then-Senate Minority Whip Trent Lott (R-Miss.) declared in a 2007 news conference. The treaty, Lott explained, “undermines U.S. sovereignty,” “would create a huge UN bureaucracy” to rule the U.S. private sector and military, “would undermine U.S. military and intelligence operations,” and “would be a huge problem in terms of navigational rights.” Five years later, however, the man who once claimed that Senate ratification of LOST would “cede our national sovereignty — both militarily and economically,” is lobbying that very body to approve the treaty.

As the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year 2013 comes before the House of Representatives, Congressmen Adam Smith and Justin Amash offer an amendment forbidding indefinite detention.

 JBS CEO Art Thompson's video news update for May 14-20, 2012.

On Thursday morning, the House Armed Services Committee passed the 2013 version of the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA); the provision providing for the indefinite detention of Americans remains in the bill.

JBS Facebook JBS Twitter JBS YouTube JBS RSS Feed