The Intolerable Acts was the name used by American colonists to describe a series of oppressive measures passed by the British Parliament in 1774 relating to the amount of self-government permissible in the American colonies. The acts sparked outrage and firm resistance to the tyrannical regime of King George III throughout the 13 colonies. These arbitrary violations of the rights of the colonists — rights enjoyed by all Englishmen — resulted in the convening of the First Continental Congress in order to organize a formal denouncement of the decrees and to unite the Americans in their resistance to the Crown. Despite various attempts by several delegates to reconcile with Britain, independence was declared within two years and the American War for Independence raged until liberty was achieved in 1783.
 
 
 
 

In a formal "request for information," the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) asked software companies for a digital tool that would systematically scan the entire social media realm to find potential terrorist-related threats and intelligence information. While hundreds of intelligence analysts are already probing overseas Facebook and Twitter posts, U.S. law enforcement officials claim digital software could sift through more data than humans ever could.

 

Western governments and the notorious al-Qaeda terror network have teamed up to bring down the relatively secular dictatorship of Bashar al-Assad in Syria, eerily reminiscent of the “regime change” operation in Libya supported by both NATO and a broad coalition of well-known Islamic terrorists on the ground.
 
 

An armed uprising in Libya is imminent as people in the oil-rich North African nation continue to reject the new NATO-backed regime, one of slain Libyan despot Muammar Gadhafi’s sons told an Arabic TV station on Friday from neighboring Niger. Libya’s new rulers dismissed the statements and threatened the “interests” of the government of Niger if it did not hand over Saadi Gadhafi for prosecution.
 

An attorney for an American accused of conspiring to carry out the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 has filed suit in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia challenging a new rule at the Guantanamo Bay Detention Facility instructing agents of the military and the government to read all correspondence between lawyers and those prisoners suspected of being 9/11 conspirators.

 

Once again, a provision of the National Defense Authorization Act is being cited by Washington as justification for a new policy position.  Listing Section 1245 of the NDAA, on Monday, President Barack Obama signed an executive order imposing a roster of new sanctions on the government of Iran, including the Central Bank of Iran.
 
 
 
 

Another brave state legislator has joined the resistance to federal tyranny by defending the constitutional right of states to govern themselves. On February 3, Oklahoma Rep. Charles Key (R-Oklahoma City) offered a bill that would officially request that the Congress of the United States repeal Sections 1021 and 1022 of the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA). Furthermore, the legal effect of those two sections would be void in Oklahoma.
 
 
 
 

On the morning of January 11, Mostafa Ahmadi Roshan, a 32-year-old chemist from Sharif University in Tehran, was riding in a Peugeot 405 along Shahid Golnabi Street in eastern Tehran. As his car inched through the morning rush-hour traffic, two men on motorcycles approached Roshan’s vehicle, attached a magnetic bomb to the side of the car, and raced off just before the Peugeot and its prominent passenger were blown to bits. Roshan — who was also deputy director for commercial affairs at Iran’s Natanz nuclear reactor — had just become the latest victim of an apparent covert campaign of assassination targeting high-profile Iranian scientists allegedly involved in the Islamic republic’s controversial nuclear program.

 

Army Lt. Col. Daniel L. Davis survived the first invasion into Iraq in 1991. He later left active duty and worked for a Texas senator while serving in the Army Reserves. Called back into active duty, he did a tour in Afghanistan (2005-06, another in Iraq, 2008-09), and back to Afghanistan during 2011. During last year's tour, he was part of the Army's Rapid Equipping Tour that took him into every part of the embattled country and enabled him to have "conversations with 250 soldiers in the field." Back in the U.S., he has just issued a blistering report claiming that, despite the deployment of a force exceeding 100,000, there is a glaring "absence of success on virtually every level." He even witnessed Afghan military personnel "collude with the insurgency."

 

Big Brother is set to adopt a new form of surveillance after a bill passed by Congress will require the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to open U.S. airspace to drone flights under a new four-year plan. The bill, which passed the House last week and received bipartisan approval in the Senate on Monday, will convert radar to an air traffic control system based on GPS technology, shifting the country to an age where satellites are central to air traffic control and unmanned drones glide freely throughout U.S. airspace.

 

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