The U.S. government is developing implantable sensor microchips for use in American troops, supposedly to monitor their health on the battlefield, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) announced earlier this year seeking proposals. But critics of the scheme are speaking out, warning that the new technology could just be a prelude to expanding the use of related devices among the general population — with dangerous implications for freedom and privacy.

It would be funny if we weren't paying for it. Now they want us to buy chaperones for our live-wire Secret Service guys. Per year, we already spend $1.7 billion on the Secret Service, double what we spent annually before Mohamed Atta and his crew of inflamed sycophants sought to win perpetual ecstasy with some 72 heavenly hotties per martyr by turning jetliners and themselves into missiles.

The partisan squabbling over the killing of Osama bin Laden is a typical election-year distraction, effectively squelching discussion of more important matters one year after the execution of the al-Qaeda chief executive. While the commentators are engaged in trivialities, big foreign-policy questions are ignored.

The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals granted qualified immunity to John Yoo, shielding him from liability for torture carried out using guidelines set by him while working in the George W. Bush Justice Department.

Areas on the U.S. side of the southwest U.S.-Mexican border are “some of the safest communities in America,” says CBP Director Gene Garza.

 

White House senior counterterrorism adviser John Brennan has tried to justify proliferating drone strikes in Islamic countries this week as a legitimate reaction to the threat posed by the September 11 attacks more than a decade ago.

President Obama addressed the nation from Afghanistan May 1, claiming victory over al Qaeda and touting a new agreement with Afghan President Hamid Karzai keeping U.S. troops in combat in the nation for at least two more years.

Just weeks ago the CIA requested expanded authority to deploy drones to target and kill suspected militants hiding in Yemen. To no one’s surprise, President Obama has given them that authority.

President Obama last week gave an interview in the Situation Room at the White House to discuss the decision he made one year ago to send Navy SEALs on the mission that resulted in killing of al Qaeda leader Osama Bin Laden. And less that three years after Obama was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, he is winning praise as the "Warrior in Chief" carrying on a "militarily aggressive" foreign policy.

Predator Drones have proven not to be worth the cost in their ability to curb contraband, drug traffic, and illegal alien activity.

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