The governments of the United States and the United Kingdom are permitting the sale of state of the art surveillance equipment to some of the world’s most notorious regimes. Concerned citizens in both nations worry that these devices will be employed by the buyers to monitor activists and those who dare speak out against governmental oppression.

 

With gasoline prices climbing back up toward $4 a gallon, the President's health care reform in troubled constitutional waters, and job growth underperforming even the most pessimistic forecasts in the third year of an anemic economic expansion, no one should be surprised if the President's reelection team would like to change the subject. This year, "It's the economy, stupid" will likely not be the mantra for the Democratic presidential candidate as it was for Bill Clinton in 1992.


 

Journalists are pressing forward in their pursuit of the rescue of the Bill of Rights from a federal government determined to hold not only the Constitution hostage, but perhaps indefinitely detain those brave enough to defend it.

 

As part of its ongoing covert war against Iran, the U.S. government has for years been providing training — some of it on American soil — and other material support to a State Department-designated “foreign terrorist organization,” the Mujahedeen-e-Khalq (MEK), the New Yorker’s Seymour M. Hersh reports.

 

On March 8 the state Senate of Virginia passed HB 1160, the bill that would  prevent the use of any state agency or member of the Virginia National Guard or Virginia Defense Force to participate in the unlawful detention of a citizen of Virginia by the U.S. government in violation of the state and federal constitution as set forth in the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA).

The Federal Reserve System investigated itself and determined that concerns about undue political influence surrounding its alleged role in the Nixon Watergate scandal and a subsequent cover up, as well as allegations that the Fed facilitated a massive weapons loan to former Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein, were unfounded. Analysts and critics of the central bank, however, were not entirely convinced.

The charge made by a report from the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) that the country’s students score poorly despite U.S. schools spending more than schools in other countries surprised no one. What was surprising was their recommendation: Leave things alone.

 

Late Monday, the United States State Department’s Rewards for Justice program posted on its website a bounty of $10 million for Hafiz Mohammad Saeed.  Saeed is wanted primarily for his alleged role in bombings in Mumbai on November 26, 2008, when explosions blasted through two hotels, a train station, and a Jewish Chabad house. The attacks resulted in the deaths of 166 people in South Mumbai.
 
 

While Washington's political leaders and much of the nation's news media have been calling attention to and raising alarm over Iran's nuclear program, the United States has been quietly making plans for nuclear-powered unmanned planes, according to the London Guardian newspaper.

 

The future of Egypt in the aftermath of last year’s “Arab Spring” is being written by the dominant Islamist organization in that nation, the Muslim Brotherhood. Since the fall of the Mubarak government in February 2011, the Muslim Brotherhood has been steadily establishing itself as the center of power in the new Egypt. In the process, the organization is now preparing to break a crucial promise that its leadership made last year: the Muslim Brotherhood is now seeking to install one of its own as president of Egypt.

 

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