Over a year has passed since the “Arab Spring” came to Egypt, and the evidence continues to accumulate demonstrating that what has come of last year’s revolution is bringing a "chill" to the relationship between the United States and Egypt.

 

Since the September 11, 2001 attacks by al-Qaeda terrorists on the United States, and the United States’ invasion of Afghanistan in 2001 and Iraq in 2003, vague invocations of “the Crusades” have gained a new relevance. Both sides of the conflict have sought to link the current series of wars to those of the Crusades — either by way of justifying or denouncing of their current course of action. History is one of the victims of the current conflict, as the much-maligned and ill-remembered Crusades have been recast time and again to serve various agendas.

 

Senator John McCain (R-Ariz.) says it is “shameful” that NATO hasn’t acted to suppress the unrest in Syria.  At an event sponsored by the Atlantic Council, McCain continued beating the war drum for American military intervention in yet another Middle Eastern civil conflict.
 
 
 

Last weekend The New American published an article about President Obama’s issuing of a new Executive Order granting himself power to seize control of America’s national resources during a time of “national emergency.”
 
 

Rep. Walter Jones (R-N.C.) asked Tuesday when Congress might hear that it's time for Americans to come home from the war "Uncle Chang" is funding in Afghanistan.
 
 

JBS CEO Art Thompson's weekly video news update for March 19-25, 2012.

President Barack Obama issued an Executive Order on March 16 giving the White House absolute control over all the country’s natural resources in case of a natural disaster or during a time of war.

Last week PFC Bradley Manning’s lawyer submitted a motion to dismiss the case against his client. Manning, who is accused of passing classified documents to WikiLeaks, is charged with 22 crimes, including giving aid to the enemy as defined in the Espionage Act (18 USC Chapter 37).

 

In the little town of Bluffdale, Utah, between the Wasatch Range and the Oquirrh Mountains, the National Security Agency (NSA) is building what will be the nation's largest spy center, reports Wired, a print magazine and online publication reporting on technological developments and their effects, including electronic privacy. Dubbed the Utah Data Center, the project is already employing thousands of hardhat workers in its construction and will soon have some 10,000 construction workers building a data center that will be more than five times the size of the nation's capitol, Wired reports.

 

The good news is that in the near future governments, including our own, may no longer be planting bugs or tapping phones to spy on people. The bad news is they won't have to. New surveillance technology has been developed that will enable the CIA and other agencies to keep its eyes and ears on what people are watching and listening to by a series of connected gadgets activated when a movie is downloaded or a Web radio station is turned on.

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