The good news is that in the near future governments, including our own, may no longer be planting bugs or tapping phones to spy on people. The bad news is they won't have to. New surveillance technology has been developed that will enable the CIA and other agencies to keep its eyes and ears on what people are watching and listening to by a series of connected gadgets activated when a movie is downloaded or a Web radio station is turned on.

A driver who crashed a vehicle on a Kabul runway near Leon Panetta's plane Wednesday may have been targeting the U.S. Defense Secretary in a car bomb attack, the Iranian Press TV reported. The Secretary was not injured and the alleged perpetrator has been arrested, the International Security Assistance Force in Kabul said.

Between 15 and 20 American soldiers were involved in the March 11 massacre of civilians in Kandahar Province, according to a parliamentary probe of the killings, not merely one sergeant as has been widely reported for the past week. An investigative team of parliament members spent two days in the province, interviewing members of the victims' families and tribal elders and gathering evidence related to last Sunday's murders in which 16 Afghan civilians, including nine children, were killed and their bodies set on fire. The attacks lasted one hour Sunday morning and were carried out by two groups of U.S. soldiers, the leader of the investigative team told Pajhwok Afghan News.

 

The President of Afghanistan has called for U.S. troop presence his country to be limited to American military bases by 2013, insisting that the transition of control of the country to the Afghan military be moved up a year from the previously agreed to date. The announcement by President Hamid Karzai came only hours after President Obama had pledged to stick to the scheduled withdrawal of U.S. combat troops by 2014, the New York Times reported.

 

While the presidential candidates of both major American political parties are spending far less time on the troubled relationship between the United States and Mexico in this year’s election cycle than they did in 2008, a report from Proceso magazine indicates that the descent of America’s southern neighbor into utter chaos cannot be ignored forever. The Proceso exposé details the success of the “Los Zetas” cartel in infiltrating various levels of Mexico’s military, law enforcement, and other elements of the nation’s government, and it casts the future of that nation as a struggle between various cartels.

On Wednesday, March 14, cnsnews.com reported that gun battles between Mexican military and Mexican drug traffickers caused U.S. authorities to shut down two international crossings in Texas. The two bridges form the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) port of entry in Eagle Pass (county seat of Maverick County) Texas, about 140 miles southwest of San Antonio.

On the heels of Prime Minister Netanyahu’s meeting with President Obama concerning what to do about Iran’s supposedly dangerous race for nuclear weapons, the former chief of Israel’s intelligence service told CBS News that he believes it would not make sense for Israel to launch an air strike against its enemy’s uranium enrichment facilities before all other options are exhausted.

 

The Obama administration and top former officials are reportedly violating federal law by offering support to the Iranian Mujahedin-e Khalq, a notorious Islamic-Communist terror group that has murdered senior American personnel and is officially designated a “foreign terrorist organization” by the U.S. State Department.

 

A U.S. Army staff sergeant is in military custody following a gruesome shooting spree in rural villages of Afghanistan Sunday that killed at least 16 civilians, nine of them children. The suspect is believed to have carried out the shootings alone before surrendering to military authorities, the New York Times reported. "The initial reporting that we have at this time indicates there was one shooter, and we have one man in custody," said Lt. Col. Jimmie Cummings, a NATO spokesman.

 

When Eric Holder said in a speech last week that the President has the authority to order the killing of U.S. citizens abroad, many wondered if the rationale offered by the Attorney General for targeting Americans for non-judicial killing would also apply within the borders of the United States. Testifying at a congressional hearing, FBI Director Robert Mueller said he did not know and would have to check with others at the U.S. Department of Justice.

 

JBS Facebook JBS Twitter JBS YouTube JBS RSS Feed