Legislation

The average American is more likely to die in his bathtub than be killed by an Islamic terrorist. That is but one of many fascinating statistics presented by Charles Kenny (no relations to this writer) in his article on Businessweek.com,"Airport Security Is Making Americans Less Safe."

A newsecretive effort by the Department of Homeland Security entitled the Buffer Zone Protection Program will combine the department with local law enforcement agencies to keep citizens under constant surveillance.

Department of Homeland Security seeks funds to purchase 14 new Predator drones.

The dizzying speed of the growth of the surveillance state and the increasing sophistication of the tools used to build it are paid for in large measure by funds doled out by the Army’s Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA).

The Maryland Transit Administration has installed microphones in 10 buses to record passenger conversations. The microphones -- which the city plans to install in 330 more buses by next summer — are attached to the existing video surveillance system monitoring the city’s public transportation.

Seems that our coverage of the ever-widening and increasingly sophisticated web of surveillance being spun by state and federal agencies is only scratching the surface — literally.

Recently stories have been published regarding a subtler weapon being developed and deployed by private citizens determined to defend themselves from the government and its widening war against our constitutionally protected civil liberties: small wearable computers.

Although the president’s use of drones to execute the war on terror and those he assumes are associated with it has so far occurred only outside the United States, soon drones will slice through the domestic skies, as well. While the sight of drones over U.S. cities and towns is rare now, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) predicts that by 2020, 30,000 of these unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) will be patrolling American airspace.

On October 29, a federal district court judge ruled that police can enter onto privately owned property and install secret surveillance cameras without a warrant.

The judge did set forth a few guidelines that must be followed before such activity would be permissible, but the fact that such a scenario is accepted as constitutional by a federal judge is a serious setback for privacy and for the Fourth Amendment.

There may have been more talk about dogs at the U.S. Supreme Court than at the American Kennel Club Wednesday, as the justices heard arguments in two cases involving the state of Florida and drug-sniffing police dogs.

How far may police officers with drug-detecting canines go in sniffing around the outside of a home before obtaining a search warrant?

JBS Facebook JBS Twitter JBS YouTube JBS RSS Feed