Legislation

In a letter published in Foreign Affairs, the official journal of the Council on Foreign Relations, Senator Carl Levin claims that the NDAA only reaffirms existing law and that America is safer since its enactment.

The U.S. government is developing implantable sensor microchips for use in American troops, supposedly to monitor their health on the battlefield, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) announced earlier this year seeking proposals. But critics of the scheme are speaking out, warning that the new technology could just be a prelude to expanding the use of related devices among the general population — with dangerous implications for freedom and privacy.

In a surprise move the White House issued a statement on Wednesday threatening to veto CISPA (Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act) because of privacy concerns. Parts of the statement sounded as if they had been drafted by Republican presidential candidate Ron Paul:

Is saving 30 percent on your car insurance enough to justify granting Big Brother access to your vehicle? That’s the question many consumers and industry analysts are asking, as more auto insurance companies offer new options that calculate premiums based on a person’s driving habits, rather than set variables such as age, gender, and past driving records.

An Internet censorship and privacy-destroying bill will be taken up by the House this week.

This is “cybersecurity week,” according to Brock Meeks at Wired.com when CISPA (the Orwellian-named Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act) is scheduled to move to the House floor for a vote. Offered originally before SOPA (the Stop Online Piracy Act) and its sister PIPA (Preventing Real Online Threats to Economic Creativity and Theft of Intellectual Property Act) were blown up in January, Reps. Mike Rogers (R-Mich.) and Dutch Ruppersberger (D-Md.) have offered some amendments to the bill (H.R. 3523) to soften some of its critics and to avoid the same result.

 JBS CEO Art Thompson's Second Video Analysis for the Week of April 23-29, 2012.

The shadowy but controversial National Security Agency (NSA) — despite U.S. law and constitutional protections — has collected most of the e-mails sent and received by Americans, agency whistleblower William Binney explained during an explosive TV interview. Phone calls and other forms of electronic communications are also routinely targeted.

Next time your family plays a game on your Wii gaming system, you may be giving the Department of Homeland Security access to your address, credit card numbers, online passwords, and chat conversations.

 
 

The governments of the United States and the United Kingdom are permitting the sale of state of the art surveillance equipment to some of the world’s most notorious regimes. Concerned citizens in both nations worry that these devices will be employed by the buyers to monitor activists and those who dare speak out against governmental oppression.

 

JBS Facebook JBS Twitter JBS YouTube JBS RSS Feed