Legislation

In advance of the announcement of his vice-presidential running mate, Mitt Romney has released a smartphone app that is capable of tracking users' GPS location, as well as writing to their SD card.

Kentucky Senator Rand Paul's bill to protect citizens from surveillance by drones needs 48 more cosponsors in order to rein in the Supreme Court's approvals of such surveillance.

 About a year ago, a federal appeals court ordered the deeply unpopular Transportation Security Administration (TSA) to obey the law and hold public hearings on its widely loathed “naked body scanners.” The massive bureaucracy flouted the judicial order and has so far failed to comply. This week, however, the court demanded that the Department of Homeland Security explain itself by the end of the month.

When Houston-area activist Thelma Taormina was allegedly shoved multiple times by a man trying to install a controversial so-called “smart meter” on her home, she had already told the public-utility subcontractor that he was trespassing and to get off her property. When he continued to refuse, Taormina told The New American in an interview, she went inside and got her gun. That worked. 

In it decision in the case of the United States v. Oliva, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals held that the federal government may remotely convert cellphones into roving bugs.

Judge Stephen W. Smith has criticized the law permitting the process of obtaining an electronic surveillance warrant to be kept secret.

The Pentagon wants bright college kids to help them design and perfect software that will allow government agents to quickly single out individuals from still photos and video footage of crowd scenes. As with most government projects, this particular operation has been given an innocuous and meaningless name: Innovation House Study.

 "If you're concerned about it, maybe there's a reason we should be flying over you, right?" That’s the callous response of one drone trade group representative when asked his opinion of those who worry about the increasing use of the unmanned aerial vehicles and the corresponding decrease in privacy and civil liberties.

The Justice Department is suing a telecommunications company for challenging a request from the Federal Bureau of Investigation for customer information — despite the fact that the law authorizing the request explicitly permits such challenges.

 Have you ever heard of a tech company called Neustar? Probably not, and that’s just the way the government wants to keep it. Neustar is a relatively new company that is playing a large, albeit secret, role in the expansion of the surveillance state. According to published reports, Neustar handles the law enforcement surveillance and user data requests for over 400 telecommunications companies. To accommodate their clients’ demands, Neustar maintains a database containing information on every cell phone in the United States — including yours.

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