The Wisconsin State Legislature will take up the Castle Doctrine in October.

Congressman Darrell Issa (R-Calif.), Chairman of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, is not impressed with the explanations given by Attorney General Eric Holder and other Department of Justice spokesmen about Operation Fast and Furious — the gun-walker scandal in which ATF officials oversaw the transfer of 2,000 weapons across the border to brutal Mexican drug cartels, mainly the Sinaloa group. He is calling for a formal review by someone outside the government:

We’d like to have a true special prosecutor, particular when it’s obvious if Eric Holder didn’t know, it’s because he didn’t want to know or because he wasn’t doing his job…We’d like to know who did know and why they didn’t brief the attorney general.

Holder in May said that he did not know when he first heard about the operation. Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano claimed that she did not know about the operation until after some weapons sold by federal officers to Mexican drug cartels were found to have been used to murder Border Patrol agents.

High-ranking officials across Mexico including the Attorney General are reportedly demanding answers from the U.S. government about its secret program that sent high-powered weaponry across the border to drug cartels, saying the Obama administration’s explanations so far are inadequate. The Mexican public is outraged as well.

Hundreds of Mexicans including law-enforcement officers have been murdered with guns traced back to the operation, which was handled by the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (still known as ATF). “Project Gunrunner” weapons were also involved in the deaths of at least a few American agents including Border Patrol officer Brian Terry.

Under “Operation Fast and Furious,” the Obama administration was deliberately providing sophisticated and powerful weapons to violent Mexican drug cartels — often using taxpayer money. He was simultaneously campaigning for stricter U.S. gun control by citing violence in Mexico.

The New Hampshire Legislature has overridden a veto by governor John Lynch of a bill to allow citizens to use deadly force against assailants anywhere they have a right to be. The state House of Representatives voted 251-111 in support of the bill Wednesday, exceeding the two-thirds vote needed for an override. The state Senate last week voted for the override. 17-7.
 
The bill expands a provision of existing law, often called the "castle doctrine," that allows the use of deadly force in self-defense, or the defense of others, in one's home or attached property. In all other places, current law requires a person under threat of attack to retreat to safety whenever possible. The new law, effective within 60 days of passage, removes the retreat requirement for someone under attack "anywhere he or she has a right to be." Supporters said a resort to lethal force in defense of one's life or the life of others should be legal in public places as much as in the home.

When Jeremy Hoven put his concealed carry permit to use for self-defense purposes during an armed robbery last May, he was fired by his employer, Walgreens. Though Hoven defended the use of his weapon by asserting he feared for his life, and while no one was injured during the encounter, Walgreens issued a pink slip, prompting Hoven to file a wrongful termination lawsuit.

At a Walgreens in Benton Township, Michigan, two armed robbers wearing masks burst in at 4:30 am with weapons drawn. Pharmacist Jeremy Hoven was working behind his counter when he saw the attackers grab the Walgreens store manager as a hostage. The men also jumped behind Hoven’s counter, with their weapons drawn. While one of the masked men held a gun to the head of one of the Walgreens’ employees, the other attempted to shoot Hoven three times, but his gun would not fire.
 

With "gun control" a popular rallying cry for liberals across the country, it seemed only a matter of time before they turned their attention to other items that are potentially dangerous. Lawmakers in Boston are now looking to restrict the sale of pocketknives.

The city of Boston has witnessed over 1,300 knife attacks over the course of the last two years. Politicians in Boston now believe that by restricting the sale of pocketknives, these stabbings will decrease.

On Thursday, the Public Safety Committee of the Boston City Council began holding a hearing on whether they should license the sale of knives in the city of Boston. According to the Boston City Council, the purpose of the hearing is as follows:

When the government infringes upon Second Amendment rights through regulation and harsh gun control, it is accused of violating one’s right to self-defense. There is no greater example of this violation, however, than when the federal government attempted to punish a man for killing a grizzly bear that threatened his life and the lives of his family. Fortunately, when the story was publicized and received a great deal of negative media attention, federal prosecutors decided to drop the charges.

Idaho resident Jeremy Hill faced trial after he killed a grizzly bear that came into his yard on May 8. According to Hill, his six children were playing in their yard when three grizzly bears — a mother and her two cubs — entered the property. The children called to their father who was inside of his home. He immediately came out with a rifle.

According to neighbors of the Hill family, the bears had visited several properties that day before their stop at the Hill home.

With New York City seeing an increase in gun-related violence in recent weeks, New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg is now calling for more stringent federal gun control laws to address the problem. The legislation Bloomberg is calling for is reported to be some of the strictest in the country.

Much of Bloomberg’s inspirations came after Labor Day weekend, after a series of shootings took place in New York. The Wall Street Journal reports:

The shooting of a police officer in Crown Heights, Brooklyn, on Monday night punctuated a Labor Day weekend burst of violence that left at least 10 dead and more than 50 injured since Friday morning. An innocent woman sitting on her stoop and two men with guns were killed in the Monday evening shootout, officials said. One police officer was shot in the arm, another was wounded by bullet fragments.

At least three White House officials received email updates on "Operation Fast and Furious," a gun-walker scandal that saw the transfer of some 2,000 weapons into the hands of the Mexican-based Sinaloa drug cartel. CBS News' Sharyl Attkisson reported September 2 that "three White House officials were briefed on gun trafficking efforts that included Fast and Furious. The officials are Kevin O'Reilly, then-director of North American Affairs, now assigned to the State Department; Dan Restrepo, senior Latin American advisory; and Greg Gatjanis, a national security official."

The three White House officials being advised on the progress of the botched transfer were in addition to the top leadership of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms. Both Acting Director of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms (ATF) Kenneth Melson and U.S. District Attorney for Phoenix Dennis K. Burke resigned their positions over "Operation Fast and Furious" August 30. The operation was not merely responsible for the transfer of more than 2,000 guns to the Mexican-based Sinaloa drug cartel, but many of the weapons were high-powered weapons such as AK-47s, AR-15s and two different models of .50 caliber armor-piercing sniper weapons with a kill range of over a mile.
 

Citizens in the Aloha State of Hawaii are seeking to challenge the restrictive gun regulations on the books on the basis that they violate Second Amendment rights. In a lawsuit mounted by Chris Baker, President of Hawaii Defense Foundation, Baker contends that Hawaii’s firearms licensing statutes and its other gun regulations are unconstitutional.

The Blaze explains some of Hawaii’s gun laws:

Hawaii is a “may issue” state, which means that police determine who gets a carry permit and who doesn’t. On the other hand, in “shall issue” states — like Texas — the government must provide concealed carry permits as long as the applicant passes all background checks and has no history of mental illness.

Baker contends that the law restricts Hawaiians from carrying a firearm except under “exceptional circumstance, [or] where a need or urgency has been sufficiently indicated.” All concealed carry permits must first be approved by the police chief in Honolulu. Baker asserts that this violates the Constitution.

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