On December 19, the Nevada chapters of People Against the National Defense Authorization Act (PANDA) announced the introduction of BDR 728, the Nevada Liberty Preservation Act. Sponsored by Nevada State Senator Don Gustavson, the bill will be presented to lawmakers in February, when the state legislature reconvenes.

South Carolina may soon join the ranks of states struggling to reclaim their constitutional sovereignty stolen from them by the federal government.

Americans may be enamored with Social Security, Medicare, and sundry other unconstitutional federal policies, but according to a new USA Today/Gallup poll, a sizable majority of them stands with the Constitution when it comes to marijuana laws.

Thomas Jefferson said a revolution every 20 years would be a good thing. Regardless of what one thinks of that, perhaps a little constitutional crisis every now and then would have its benefits.

Voters in Colorado, Oregon, and Washington State will vote on proposals next month to nullify unconstitutional federal statutes by legalizing marijuana for recreational use, setting up a potential showdown between the Obama administration and state governments that could increase interest in the U.S. Constitution’s Tenth Amendment. While the fate of Oregon’s measure remains uncertain, polls suggest Amendment 64 in Colorado and Initiative 502 in Washington State may well pass.   

Twenty-four percent (24%) of American adults believe states have the right to secede from the union and form an independent country, according to a recent survey conducted by polling professionals Rasmussen Reports.  In its telephone survey of 1,000 American adults conducted May 29-30, Rasmussen pollsters asked respondents the following question: "Do individual states have the right to leave the United States and form an independent country?"

Another state legislator is riding to the defense of the Tenth Amendment and the Constitution.  On February 21, 2012, Utah State Senator Todd Weiler (R-Woods Cross) submitted S.C.R. 11, a resolution calling for the Congress to “repeal or clarify Sections 1021 and 1022 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2012.”

Texas Governor Rick Perry agreed on Monday to add the wildly popular anti-TSA groping bill to the special session of the Texas Legislature. His decision to call up the bill followed almost a month of intense and unrelenting pressure from his constituents.

The U.S. Supreme Court may have just opened the floodgates to individuals wishing to challenge various federal laws on the grounds that they violate the 10th Amendment. In a unanimous decision, the court ruled that individuals do have standing to make such legal challenges if they can demonstrate that they will suffer harm if the laws they are challenging are applied to them.
 

High-ranking Texas officials groped by agents with the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) are sounding off about the scandal in the press, adding more pressure on state lawmakers and Gov. Rick Perry to resurrect a bill criminalizing the invasive measures without probable cause.

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