In an interview with ABC, Attorney General Eric Holder warns that the threat from home-grown terrorists is real.

Robert Gibbs, former press secretary for President Obama, said Sunday he was under orders during his White House years not to discuss or even acknowledge the existence of a "drone program." 

The Defense Clandestine Service is another step in the convergence of the military and civilian intelligence operations.

Senator Rand Paul (R-Ky.) threatened to filibuster the confirmation vote of John Brennan unless Brennan provides clear answers to the senator's questions regarding the prosecution of the drone war.

For the first time, an official of the U.S. government — Senator Lindsey Graham — has put a number on the death toll from the drone war.

House Democrat leader Rep. Nancy Pelosi of California is under fire from across the political spectrum after admitting in an interview, among a host of other controversial positions, that she was not opposed to President Obama’s secret executions of U.S. citizens without a trial or even charges. She also claimed that, depending on the timing and situation, it was acceptable for the executive branch to simply “disappear” Americans — a wildly unconstitutional notion that even most Third World dictators would never dare support publicly. 

As Congress considers creating a court with jurisdiction over the drone war, the UN launches an investigation into killing by executive decree.

Following a series of similar widely ridiculed so-called “sting” operations, the Federal Bureau of Investigation announced last week that it had foiled yet another “terror plot” that, like virtually every supposed “terrorist” case in recent years, was created and managed from start to finish by the FBI itself. This time, the dupe was a 28-year-old California man, Matthew Aaron Llaneza, with a documented history of mental illness, who apparently believed his government handlers were helping him wage “jihad.” Critics, however, say the whole scheme smacks of entrapment and a waste of taxpayer money.

Several states are enlisting in the fight to deny the federal government the power to indefinitely detain American citizens under provisions of the National Defense Authorization Act of 2013 (NDAA).

Inside a federal courtroom packed to beyond capacity, lawyers for President Obama argued that their boss has the right to deploy the U.S. armed forces to apprehend and indefinitely detain American citizens that he alone suspects of somehow supporting groups threatening national security.

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