Russian “Airborne Assault Forces” will be arriving in Colorado this May for joint terror-war exercises with U.S. soldiers, according to U.S. officials and Russian military personnel cited in media reports. The Kremlin’s Defense Ministry and the U.S. Department of Defense both said it would be the first time in history that American and Russian airborne special operations troops would be training together on U.S. soil.

Analysts and commentators across the alternative media expressed alarm about the controversial announcement, likening it to a scene out of the movie Red Dawn or the predictions made by the late radio host Bill Cooper. It was not immediately clear exactly why the Obama administration decided to allow the scheme.

“The Russian soldiers are here as invited guests of the U.S. government; this is part of a formal bilateral exchange program between the U.S. and Russia that seeks to develop transparency and promote defense reform,” Cmdr. Wendy L. Snyder, U.S. Defense Press Officer for policy, told The New American in an e-mail. “This is the first time that American and Russian special operations troops have participated in a bilateral exercise.”

A self-styled international “court” under the auspices of the United Nations ruled Thursday that former Liberian war lord and ruthless dictator Charles Taylor — who worked with the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) for years — was guilty of aiding and abetting war crimes and crimes against humanity during Sierra Leone’s ghastly civil war. He could face life in prison when his sentence is announced next month.

According to the judges on the international “tribunal,” the ex-Liberian “President” and former CIA asset was guilty of "sustained and significant" support for a reign of terror that ravaged the neighboring West African nation of Sierra Leone. He pled not guilty to all of the charges and continues to maintain his innocence — claiming the prosecution is the work of “vindictive” colonial regimes.

The "court” however, declared Taylor guilty on 11 counts anyway. Dozens of witnesses testified for and against him during the UN trial, including some celebrities. Taylor was accused of mass murder, rape, sexual slavery, using child soldiers, torture, cannibalism, and more. An estimated 500,000 people were killed or mutilated in the decade-long conflict.

Perhaps prodded by Virginia’s success in passing a law preventing the federal government from apprehending and indefinitely detaining citizens of that state, the state legislature of Arizona on Tuesday passed its own anti-NDAA bill.

 

Candidate for Senate Dan Liljenquist pledged to The New American that should he be elected to the U.S. Senate he will offer legislation explicitly repealing the indefinite detention provisions of the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA). 

 JBS CEO Art Thompson's Second Video Analysis for the Week of April 23-29, 2012.

“Sound and fury signifying nothing.” That is how Shakespeare’s Macbeth described life. That same description could be aptly applied to a bill introduced recently in the House of Representatives that purports to cure the cancerous malady that is the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA).

The CIA wants permission to deploy drones to seek and destroy suspected terrorists regardless of the potential for collateral damage (read: innocent people who might be in the kill zone).

 After agreeing to changes suggested by Governor Bob McDonnell, both houses of the state legislature of Virginia passed HB 1160, the bill sponsored (and shepherded) by Delegate Bob Marshall that prohibits state officers and agents from participating in the unconstitutional detention of citizens of the Old Dominion.

Norwegian terrorist Anders Breivik, currently on trial for a bomb attack in Oslo and a shooting spree nearby that left more than 75 people dead, has openly admitted to the mass murder. However, in court, the 33-year-old man denied criminal responsibility partly by invoking U.S. foreign policy, claiming the deadly rampage was a “preventative strike” taken in self-defense to prevent the “Islamization" of Norway.

 On Tuesday, the Supreme Court of the Netherlands upheld the decision of the Rotterdam District Court in 2011 to permit the extradition to the United States of a man suspected of contributing to the planning of a suicide bomb attack on an American military base in Afghanistan in 2010.

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