Alexander Hamilton wrote in The Federalist Papers that: “[T]he practice of arbitrary imprisonments [has] been, in all ages, the favorite and most formidable instrument of tyranny.”

This principle of constitutional liberty, when applied to the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA), reveals a frightening truth about the powers illegally granted the President in that legislation.

As has been recounted many times (never enough, however, given the urgency of the situation in which our Republic is now found) in this magazine and elsewhere, in various provisions of the NDAA, the Congress granted to the President the power to deploy the military of the United States to arrest and indefinitely detain American citizens inside or outside of the United States suspected by him (the President) of posing a military threat to national security.

Once the suspect is imprisoned, the NDAA authorizes the President to deny that person access to legal counsel (in defiance of the Sixth Amendment) and to refuse habeas corpus petitions requiring the government to inform the accused of the crimes with which he or she is being charged (in defiance of Article I, Section 8 of the Constitution). This latter deprivation of civil liberties, the one Hamilton described as tyrannical, is being challenged again by a man being held at the Guantanamo Bay Detention Facility.

The Western-backed overthrow of Libyan strongman Moammar Gadhafi likely provided huge stocks of heavy weapons to terrorist groups and criminal organizations operating in the Sahel region of North Africa, the United Nations confirmed January 26 in a report. Among the groups benefiting from the arms are al-Qaeda and the deadly Islamic terror organization Boko Haram, which is currently on a killing spree in Nigeria.

 

A Pulitzer Prize-winning former Middle Eastern correspondent for the New York Times is suing President Obama for his signing of the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA).

Chris Hedges served as a journalist at the Old Gray Lady for 15 years, covering such proto-global terror organizations as the PLO and PKK (Kurdistan Workers Party), as well as more contemporary bugaboos, al-Qaeda and the Taliban. It was his unique résumé that attracted attorneys to Hedges, and they convinced him to sign on as the plaintiff in a case they were planning in which they would directly challenge the constitutionality of the NDAA.
 
 

Earlier this week, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit in Richmond, Virginia upheld the dismissal of the complaint filed by José Padilla, an American citizen and convicted terrorist.
 

As has been reported here since the bill was first proposed, of all the evils perpetrated by the National Defense Authorization Act, one of the most sinister is the denial of the due process of law to all those detained under its provisions.
 

The Enemy Expatriation Act could lead to the indefinite detention of Americans similar to Section 1021 of the NDAA.

The Associated Press is reporting out of Paris that a French judge is seeking permission from American authorities to investigate claims of torture suffered by three French citizens while detained at Guantanamo Bay. According to the report, investigative magistrate Sophie Clement has requested access to the dossiers of the three men in order to examine all documents that may contain information relevant to the accusations made by the three French citizens.
 
 

Yesterday Ron Paul introduced a bill to repeal the Indefinite Detention Section of the NDAA law.

An explosive report published late last week by the magazine Foreign Policy, citing half-a-dozen current and former U.S. intelligence officers, claimed that spies with Israel’s Mossad agency were posing as Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) agents to recruit terrorists for a covert war against Iran. An Israeli official, however, dismissed the allegations as “nonsense.”

 

Rhode Island Representative Daniel Gordon has drafted a resolution to express his opposition to the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) “that suspended habeas corpus and civil liberties” under Section 1021. In an interview with World Net Daily, Gordon explained that that section of the act, signed into law by President Obama on New Year's Eve, "provides for the indefinite detention of American citizens by the military on American soil, without charge, and without right to legal counsel and [the] right to trial."

 

JBS Facebook JBS Twitter JBS YouTube JBS RSS Feed